Political competition and democratic stability in new democracies

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Abstract

This article examines the way in which the initial level of political competition in a new democracy affects the stability of that regime. The author argues that new democracies with low levels of initial political competition are more likely to fail because those initially excluded from the democratic game seek to subvert the regime in the future. Using data from ninety-two new democracies born since 1946, he finds that a higher level of initial political competition in a new democracy makes for a more durable democracy. New democracies at war and born during the Cold War are less likely to survive. Finally, he finds evidence that new democracies with low levels of initial political competition are also more likely to meet with civil conflict.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-245
Number of pages25
JournalBritish Journal of Political Science
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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