Political ideology predicts involvement in crime

John Paul Wright, Kevin M. Beaver, Mark Alden Morgan, Eric Joseph Connolly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Political ideology represents an imperfect yet important indicator of a host of personality traits and cognitive preferences. These preferences, in turn, seemingly propel liberals and conservatives towards divergent life-course experiences. Criminal behavior represents one particular domain of conduct where differences rooted in political ideology may exist. Using a national dataset, we test whether and to what extent political ideology is predictive of self-reported criminal behavior. Our results show that self-identified political ideology is monotonically related to criminal conduct cross-sectionally and prospectively and that liberals self-report more criminal conduct than do conservatives. We discuss potential causal mechanisms relating political ideology to individual conduct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-241
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume106
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Crime
Life Change Events
Self Report
Personality
Criminal Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Wright, J. P., Beaver, K. M., Morgan, M. A., & Connolly, E. J. (2017). Political ideology predicts involvement in crime. Personality and Individual Differences, 106, 236-241. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.10.062
Wright, John Paul ; Beaver, Kevin M. ; Morgan, Mark Alden ; Connolly, Eric Joseph. / Political ideology predicts involvement in crime. In: Personality and Individual Differences. 2017 ; Vol. 106. pp. 236-241.
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Political ideology predicts involvement in crime. / Wright, John Paul; Beaver, Kevin M.; Morgan, Mark Alden; Connolly, Eric Joseph.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 106, 01.02.2017, p. 236-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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