Polyphosphazene functionalized polyester fiber matrices for tendon tissue engineering: In vitro evaluation with human mesenchymal stem cells

M. Sean Peach, Roshan James, Udaya S. Toti, Meng Deng, Nicole L. Morozowich, Harry R. Allcock, Cato T. Laurencin, Sangamesh G. Kumbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Poly[(ethyl alanato)1(p-methyl phenoxy)1] phosphazene (PNEA-mPh) was used to modify the surface of electrospun poly(ε- caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber matrices having an average fiber diameter of 3000 ± 1700 nm for the purpose of tendon tissue engineering and augmentation. This study reports the effect of polyphosphazene surface functionalization on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, cell-construct infiltration, proliferation and tendon differentiation, as well as long term cellular construct mechanical properties. PCL fiber matrices functionalized with PNEA-mPh acquired a rougher surface morphology and led to enhanced cell adhesion as well as superior cell-construct infiltration when compared to smooth PCL fiber matrices. Long-term in vitro hMSC cultures on both fiber matrices were able to produce clinically relevant moduli. Both fibrous constructs expressed scleraxis, an early tendon differentiation marker, and a bimodal peak in expression of the late tendon differentiation marker tenomodulin, a pattern that was not observed in PCL thin film controls. Functionalized matrices achieved a more prominent tenogenic differentiation, possessing greater tenomodulin expression and superior phenotypic maturity according to the ratio of collagen I to collagen III expression. These findings indicate that PNEA-mPh functionalization is an efficient method for improving cell interactions with electrospun PCL matrices for the purpose of tendon repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number045016
JournalBiomedical Materials (Bristol)
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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