Population and productivity in the teotihuacan valley: Changing patterns of spatial association in prehispanic central Mexico

Larry Gorenflo, Nathan Gale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since its emergence earlier this century, cultural ecology has played a key role in attempts to understand the complex interrelations between cultural and environmental systems. Although rarely examined, a crucial aspect of cultural adaptation is the explicit spatial relationship between the distribution of human populations and the various resources available to them. In the following essay, we examine this particular question in terms of regional subsistence potential with settlement system remains from the Middle Horizon (Classic) and Late Horizon (Aztec) periods in the Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico. As a first step, traditional measures of association (Pearson's, Spearman's, and Kendall's) are employed to assess the point-to-point relationships between population and productivity potential. Then, recently developed randomization procedures are introduced and applied to evaluate the spatial association of these two variables. The results of these complementary avenues of analysis help to increase our understanding of the role of space in the cultural ecology of the prehispanic Teotihuacan Valley. In addition, they reaffirm the potentially powerful impact of cultural mechanisms on strategies of regional adaptation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-228
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Anthropological Archaeology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1986

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Archaeology

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