Population replacement strategies for controlling vector populations and the use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic drive

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this video, Jason Rasgon discusses population replacement strategies to control vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. "Population replacement" is the replacement of wild vector populations (that are competent to transmit pathogens) with those that are not competent to transmit pathogens. There are several theoretical strategies to accomplish this. One is to exploit the maternally-inherited symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a widespread reproductive parasite that spreads in a selfish manner at the extent of its host's fitness. Jason Rasgon discusses, in detail, the basic biology of this bacterial symbiont and various ways to use it for control of vector-borne diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere225
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Population replacement strategies for controlling vector populations and the use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic drive'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this