Population structure and attribution of human clinical Campylobacter jejuni isolates from central Europe to livestock and environmental sources

Jasna Kovac, B. Stessl, N. Čadež, I. Gruntar, M. Cimerman, K. Stingl, M. Lušicky, M. Ocepek, M. Wagner, S. Smole Možina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is among the most prevalent causes of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Domesticated animals and, especially, chicken meat are considered to be the main sources of infections. However, the contribution of surface waters and wildlife in C. jejuni transmission to humans is not well understood. We have evaluated the source attribution potential of a six-gene multiplex PCR (mPCR) method coupled with STRUCTURE analysis on a set of 410 C. jejuni strains isolated from environment, livestock, food and humans in central Europe. Multiplex PCR fingerprints were analysed using Subclade prediction algorithm to classify them into six distinct mPCR clades. A subset of C. jejuni isolates (70%) was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) demonstrating 74% congruence between mPCR and MLST. The correspondence analysis of mPCR clades and sources of isolation indicated three distinct groups in the studied C. jejuni population—the first one associated with isolates from poultry, the second one with isolates from cattle, and the third one with isolates from the environment. The STRUCTURE analysis attributed 7.2% and 21.7% of human isolates to environmental sources based on MLST and mPCR fingerprints, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-58
Number of pages8
JournalZoonoses and Public Health
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Campylobacter jejuni
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Livestock
Central European region
population structure
livestock
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Population
Dermatoglyphics
source attribution
chicken meat
gastroenteritis
Domestic Animals
Gastroenteritis
Poultry
wildlife
surface water
poultry
Meat
Chickens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Kovac, Jasna ; Stessl, B. ; Čadež, N. ; Gruntar, I. ; Cimerman, M. ; Stingl, K. ; Lušicky, M. ; Ocepek, M. ; Wagner, M. ; Smole Možina, S. / Population structure and attribution of human clinical Campylobacter jejuni isolates from central Europe to livestock and environmental sources. In: Zoonoses and Public Health. 2018 ; Vol. 65, No. 1. pp. 51-58.
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Kovac, J, Stessl, B, Čadež, N, Gruntar, I, Cimerman, M, Stingl, K, Lušicky, M, Ocepek, M, Wagner, M & Smole Možina, S 2018, 'Population structure and attribution of human clinical Campylobacter jejuni isolates from central Europe to livestock and environmental sources', Zoonoses and Public Health, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 51-58. https://doi.org/10.1111/zph.12366

Population structure and attribution of human clinical Campylobacter jejuni isolates from central Europe to livestock and environmental sources. / Kovac, Jasna; Stessl, B.; Čadež, N.; Gruntar, I.; Cimerman, M.; Stingl, K.; Lušicky, M.; Ocepek, M.; Wagner, M.; Smole Možina, S.

In: Zoonoses and Public Health, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 51-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Stingl, K.

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