Pore characterization of mine shales by low pressure nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry: Implication on water retention behavior of shales

Guijie Sang, Shimin Liu, Rui Zhang, Derek Elsworth

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The moisture-induced shale deterioration is considered one of the primary roof stability issues in underground coal mines. Understanding of the pore morphology of shale will provide clues to its water retention behavior and strength degradation due to seasonal changes in humidity in coal mines. In this study, low pressure nitrogen adsorption and high pressure mercury intrusion porosimetry were employed to characterize pore structure of one fireclay and four coal mine shales. The results suggest that the porosity and specific surface area (SSA) for all five samples are dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm). Based on the obtained pore size distributions, water retention curves are built and are closely associated to water adsorption behavior. Due to the dominant mesopores, the studied fireclay and shales behave a strong water retention capacity with matric suction reaching ~ 100-150 MPa at degree of saturation equals ~3%. Larger porosity and/or SSA tend to have higher water adsorption. Despite a relatively low porosity of the fireclay, the large matric suction over the whole range of degree of saturation corresponding to the high proportion of micro/mesopores lead to a strong water retention capacity, which in turn contributes to water adsorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2018Jun 20 2018

Other

Other52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period6/17/186/20/18

Fingerprint

shales
water retention
Mercury
intrusion
low pressure
Nitrogen
coal mine
adsorption
porosity
Fireclay
Adsorption
nitrogen
Water
suction
water
Coal mines
shale
coal
surface area
saturation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

@conference{6ab4b594b6444c3993e87a3e08ddf106,
title = "Pore characterization of mine shales by low pressure nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry: Implication on water retention behavior of shales",
abstract = "The moisture-induced shale deterioration is considered one of the primary roof stability issues in underground coal mines. Understanding of the pore morphology of shale will provide clues to its water retention behavior and strength degradation due to seasonal changes in humidity in coal mines. In this study, low pressure nitrogen adsorption and high pressure mercury intrusion porosimetry were employed to characterize pore structure of one fireclay and four coal mine shales. The results suggest that the porosity and specific surface area (SSA) for all five samples are dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm). Based on the obtained pore size distributions, water retention curves are built and are closely associated to water adsorption behavior. Due to the dominant mesopores, the studied fireclay and shales behave a strong water retention capacity with matric suction reaching ~ 100-150 MPa at degree of saturation equals ~3{\%}. Larger porosity and/or SSA tend to have higher water adsorption. Despite a relatively low porosity of the fireclay, the large matric suction over the whole range of degree of saturation corresponding to the high proportion of micro/mesopores lead to a strong water retention capacity, which in turn contributes to water adsorption.",
author = "Guijie Sang and Shimin Liu and Rui Zhang and Derek Elsworth",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
note = "52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium ; Conference date: 17-06-2018 Through 20-06-2018",

}

Sang, G, Liu, S, Zhang, R & Elsworth, D 2018, 'Pore characterization of mine shales by low pressure nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry: Implication on water retention behavior of shales', Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States, 6/17/18 - 6/20/18.

Pore characterization of mine shales by low pressure nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry : Implication on water retention behavior of shales. / Sang, Guijie; Liu, Shimin; Zhang, Rui; Elsworth, Derek.

2018. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Pore characterization of mine shales by low pressure nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry

T2 - Implication on water retention behavior of shales

AU - Sang, Guijie

AU - Liu, Shimin

AU - Zhang, Rui

AU - Elsworth, Derek

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - The moisture-induced shale deterioration is considered one of the primary roof stability issues in underground coal mines. Understanding of the pore morphology of shale will provide clues to its water retention behavior and strength degradation due to seasonal changes in humidity in coal mines. In this study, low pressure nitrogen adsorption and high pressure mercury intrusion porosimetry were employed to characterize pore structure of one fireclay and four coal mine shales. The results suggest that the porosity and specific surface area (SSA) for all five samples are dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm). Based on the obtained pore size distributions, water retention curves are built and are closely associated to water adsorption behavior. Due to the dominant mesopores, the studied fireclay and shales behave a strong water retention capacity with matric suction reaching ~ 100-150 MPa at degree of saturation equals ~3%. Larger porosity and/or SSA tend to have higher water adsorption. Despite a relatively low porosity of the fireclay, the large matric suction over the whole range of degree of saturation corresponding to the high proportion of micro/mesopores lead to a strong water retention capacity, which in turn contributes to water adsorption.

AB - The moisture-induced shale deterioration is considered one of the primary roof stability issues in underground coal mines. Understanding of the pore morphology of shale will provide clues to its water retention behavior and strength degradation due to seasonal changes in humidity in coal mines. In this study, low pressure nitrogen adsorption and high pressure mercury intrusion porosimetry were employed to characterize pore structure of one fireclay and four coal mine shales. The results suggest that the porosity and specific surface area (SSA) for all five samples are dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm). Based on the obtained pore size distributions, water retention curves are built and are closely associated to water adsorption behavior. Due to the dominant mesopores, the studied fireclay and shales behave a strong water retention capacity with matric suction reaching ~ 100-150 MPa at degree of saturation equals ~3%. Larger porosity and/or SSA tend to have higher water adsorption. Despite a relatively low porosity of the fireclay, the large matric suction over the whole range of degree of saturation corresponding to the high proportion of micro/mesopores lead to a strong water retention capacity, which in turn contributes to water adsorption.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053475556&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053475556&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Paper

AN - SCOPUS:85053475556

ER -