Postexercise hypotension is not explained by a prostaglandin-dependent peripheral vasodilation

Jennifer M. Lockwood, Mollie P. Pricher, Brad W. Wilkins, Lacy A. Holowatz, John R. Halliwill

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Abstract

In normally active individuals, postexercise hypotension after a single bout of aerobic exercise occurs due to an unexplained peripheral vasodilation. Prostaglandin production has been suggested to contribute to the increases in blood flow during and after exercise; however, its potential contribution to postexercise hypotension has not been assessed. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential contribution of a prostaglandin-dependent vasodilation to changes in systemic vascular conductance underlying postexercise hypotension; this was done by inhibiting production of prostaglandins with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen. We studied 11 healthy normotensive men (aged 23.7 ± 4.2 yr) before and during the 90 min after a 60-min bout of cycling at 60% peak O2 uptake on a control and a cyclooxygenase inhibition day (randomized). Subjects received 10 mg/kg of oral ibuprofen on the cyclooxygenase inhibition day. On both study days, arterial blood pressure (automated auscultation) and cardiac output (acetylene uptake) were measured, and systemic vascular conductance was calculated. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase had no effect on baseline values of mean arterial pressure or systemic vascular conductance (P > 0.2). After exercise on both days, mean arterial pressure was reduced (-2.2 ± 1.0 mmHg change with the control condition and -3.8 ± 1.5 mmHg change with the ibuprofen condition, both P < 0.05 vs. preexercise) and systemic vascular conductance was increased (5.2 ± 5.0% change with the control condition and 8.7 ± 4.1% change with the ibuprofen condition, both P < 0.05 vs. preexercise). There were no differences between study days (P > 0.6). These data suggest that prostaglandin-dependent vasodilation does not contribute to the increased systemic vascular conductance underlying postexercise hypotension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-453
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2005

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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