Poststroke chronic disease management

Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications

Michael Brainin, Bo Norrving, Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Larry B. Goldstein, Steven C. Cramer, Geoffrey A. Donnan, Pamela W. Duncan, Gerard Francisco, David Good, Glenn Graham, Brett M. Kissela, John Olver, Anthony Ward, Jörg Wissel, Richard Zorowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60% of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10%. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-46
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Fingerprint

Disease Management
Chronic Disease
Stroke
Continuity of Patient Care
Long-Term Care
Cognition
Research Personnel
Pain
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology

Cite this

Brainin, Michael ; Norrving, Bo ; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S. ; Goldstein, Larry B. ; Cramer, Steven C. ; Donnan, Geoffrey A. ; Duncan, Pamela W. ; Francisco, Gerard ; Good, David ; Graham, Glenn ; Kissela, Brett M. ; Olver, John ; Ward, Anthony ; Wissel, Jörg ; Zorowitz, Richard. / Poststroke chronic disease management : Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications. In: International Journal of Stroke. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 42-46.
@article{abd1959a538642ae817242ac8c7a4b02,
title = "Poststroke chronic disease management: Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications",
abstract = "This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60{\%} of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10{\%}. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.",
author = "Michael Brainin and Bo Norrving and Sunnerhagen, {Katharina S.} and Goldstein, {Larry B.} and Cramer, {Steven C.} and Donnan, {Geoffrey A.} and Duncan, {Pamela W.} and Gerard Francisco and David Good and Glenn Graham and Kissela, {Brett M.} and John Olver and Anthony Ward and J{\"o}rg Wissel and Richard Zorowitz",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00539.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "42--46",
journal = "International Journal of Stroke",
issn = "1747-4930",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Brainin, M, Norrving, B, Sunnerhagen, KS, Goldstein, LB, Cramer, SC, Donnan, GA, Duncan, PW, Francisco, G, Good, D, Graham, G, Kissela, BM, Olver, J, Ward, A, Wissel, J & Zorowitz, R 2011, 'Poststroke chronic disease management: Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications', International Journal of Stroke, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 42-46. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00539.x

Poststroke chronic disease management : Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications. / Brainin, Michael; Norrving, Bo; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.; Goldstein, Larry B.; Cramer, Steven C.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Duncan, Pamela W.; Francisco, Gerard; Good, David; Graham, Glenn; Kissela, Brett M.; Olver, John; Ward, Anthony; Wissel, Jörg; Zorowitz, Richard.

In: International Journal of Stroke, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 42-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Poststroke chronic disease management

T2 - Towards improved identification and interventions for poststroke spasticity-related complications

AU - Brainin, Michael

AU - Norrving, Bo

AU - Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.

AU - Goldstein, Larry B.

AU - Cramer, Steven C.

AU - Donnan, Geoffrey A.

AU - Duncan, Pamela W.

AU - Francisco, Gerard

AU - Good, David

AU - Graham, Glenn

AU - Kissela, Brett M.

AU - Olver, John

AU - Ward, Anthony

AU - Wissel, Jörg

AU - Zorowitz, Richard

PY - 2011/2/1

Y1 - 2011/2/1

N2 - This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60% of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10%. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.

AB - This paper represents the opinion of a group of researchers and clinicians with an established interest in poststroke care and is based on the recognised need for long-term care following stroke, especially in view of the global increase of disability due to stroke. Among the more frequent long-term complications following stroke are spasticity-related disabilities. Although spasticity alone occurs in up to 60% of stroke survivors, disabling spasticity affects only 4-10%. Spasticity further interferes with important functions of daily life when it occurs in association with pain, motor impairment, and overall declines of cognitive and neurological function. It is proposed that the aftermath of stroke be considered a chronic disease requiring a multifactorial and multilevel approach. There are, however, knowledge gaps related to the prediction and recognition of poststroke disability. Interventions to prevent or minimise such disabilities require further development and evaluation. Poststroke spasticity research should focus on reducing disability and be considered as part of a continuum of chronic care requirements and should be recognised as a part of a comprehensive poststroke disease management programme.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650940718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650940718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00539.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1747-4949.2010.00539.x

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 42

EP - 46

JO - International Journal of Stroke

JF - International Journal of Stroke

SN - 1747-4930

IS - 1

ER -