Potential clients' beliefs about the relative competency and caring of psychologists

Implications for the profession

Barbara A. Bremer, Richard Foxx, Midge Lee, Dana Lykins, Venus R. Mintz, Emily Stine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess the extent to which the results reported by Warner and Bradley (1991) can be generalized beyond the population of undergraduate psychology students. 132 adults in the metropolitan Harrisburg area were asked to evaluate the competency and traits of clinical psychologists. Licensed professional counselors, and psychiatrists. Results indicated that the general public believed counselors to be more caring than psychologists and psychiatrists. All three professional groups were perceived to be comparable in their ability to treat the least severe disorders. Licensed counselors were perceived to be most competent to treat disorders rated by the subjects as moderately severe, comparable in competence to clinical psychologists for adjustment disorders, and comparable to psychiatrists for marital problems. Psychiatrists and psychologists were considered the most competent to treat the most severe disorder, major depression. The results indicate that while clinical psychologists often were viewed as competent, they were not viewed as the single practitioner of choice for any diagnostic classification, nor were they noted to have positive character traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1479-1488
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of clinical psychology
Volume57
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Psychology
Psychiatry
Clinical Competence
Adjustment Disorders
Aptitude
Psychologists
Competency
Psychiatrists
Depression
Students
Counselors
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Bremer, Barbara A. ; Foxx, Richard ; Lee, Midge ; Lykins, Dana ; Mintz, Venus R. ; Stine, Emily. / Potential clients' beliefs about the relative competency and caring of psychologists : Implications for the profession. In: Journal of clinical psychology. 2001 ; Vol. 57, No. 12. pp. 1479-1488.
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Potential clients' beliefs about the relative competency and caring of psychologists : Implications for the profession. / Bremer, Barbara A.; Foxx, Richard; Lee, Midge; Lykins, Dana; Mintz, Venus R.; Stine, Emily.

In: Journal of clinical psychology, Vol. 57, No. 12, 01.01.2001, p. 1479-1488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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