Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support-An In Vitro Study

Shigang Wang, Brian J. Chin, Frank Gentile, Allen R. Kunselman, David Palanzo, Akif Ündar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000rpm (500rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3±0.1 to -462.0±0.5mmHg at 2000-4000rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10573±271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-94
Number of pages6
JournalArtificial organs
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Oxygenators
Constriction
Pumps
Tubing
Pressure
Centrifugal pumps
Clamping devices
Life Support Systems
Flow rate
Membrane Oxygenators
Networks (circuits)
Alkenes
Embolism
Hematocrit
Information Systems
In Vitro Techniques
Data acquisition
Blood
Erythrocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support-An In Vitro Study",
abstract = "The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35{\%}). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000rpm (500rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3±0.1 to -462.0±0.5mmHg at 2000-4000rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10573±271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon.",
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Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support-An In Vitro Study. / Wang, Shigang; Chin, Brian J.; Gentile, Frank; Kunselman, Allen R.; Palanzo, David; Ündar, Akif.

In: Artificial organs, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 89-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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