Power distance belief and impulsive buying

Yinlong Zhang, Karen Page Winterich, Vikas Mittal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors propose that power distance belief (PDB) (i.e., accepting and expecting power disparity) influences impulsive buying beyond other related cultural dimensions, such as individualism-collectivism. This research supports an associative account that links PDB and impulsive buying as a manifestation of self-control, such that those with high PDB display less impulsive buying. Furthermore, this effect manifests for vice products but not for virtue products. The authors also find that restraint from temptations can occur automatically for people who have repeated practice (i.e., chronically high PDBs). Taken together, these results imply that products should be differentially positioned as vice or virtue products in accordance with consumers' PDBs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)945-954
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Marketing Research
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

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Power distance
Individualism/collectivism
Temptation
Cultural dimensions
Self-control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

Zhang, Yinlong ; Winterich, Karen Page ; Mittal, Vikas. / Power distance belief and impulsive buying. In: Journal of Marketing Research. 2010 ; Vol. 47, No. 5. pp. 945-954.
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Power distance belief and impulsive buying. / Zhang, Yinlong; Winterich, Karen Page; Mittal, Vikas.

In: Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 47, No. 5, 01.10.2010, p. 945-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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