Practice Patterns Among Eye Care Providers at US Teaching Hospitals With Regard to Assessing and Educating Patients About Smoking

Zachary C. Landis, Ramunas Rolius, Ingrid U. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose To investigate practice patterns of eye care providers at academic medical centers in the United States (US) with regard to assessing patients' smoking status and exposure, educating patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and counseling patients about smoking cessation. Design Cross-sectional survey. Methods An anonymous survey including multiple choice and Likert-style questions was constructed on http://www.surveymonkey.com and emailed to the coordinators of all 113 US ophthalmology residency programs, with a request to forward to all faculty, fellows, residents, and optometrists at their institution. Main outcome measures include proportion of eye care providers who assess patients' smoking status, educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and discuss with patients smoking cessation options. Results Of the 292 respondents, 229 (78%) “always” or “periodically” ask patients about their smoking status, 251 (86%) “seldom” or “never” ask patients about secondhand smoke exposure, 245 (84%) “always” or “periodically” educate patients about ocular diseases associated with smoking, 142 (49%) “seldom” or “never” ask patients who smoke about their willingness to quit smoking, and 249 (85%) “seldom” or “never” discuss potential methods and resources to assist with smoking cessation. Conclusions Most eye care providers assess patients' smoking status and educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking. However, approximately half do not ask, or seldom ask, about patients' willingness to quit smoking, and most do not discuss smoking cessation options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-90
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume180
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

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State Hospitals
Teaching Hospitals
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Eye Diseases
Ophthalmology
Internship and Residency
Smoke
Counseling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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title = "Practice Patterns Among Eye Care Providers at US Teaching Hospitals With Regard to Assessing and Educating Patients About Smoking",
abstract = "Purpose To investigate practice patterns of eye care providers at academic medical centers in the United States (US) with regard to assessing patients' smoking status and exposure, educating patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and counseling patients about smoking cessation. Design Cross-sectional survey. Methods An anonymous survey including multiple choice and Likert-style questions was constructed on http://www.surveymonkey.com and emailed to the coordinators of all 113 US ophthalmology residency programs, with a request to forward to all faculty, fellows, residents, and optometrists at their institution. Main outcome measures include proportion of eye care providers who assess patients' smoking status, educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking, and discuss with patients smoking cessation options. Results Of the 292 respondents, 229 (78{\%}) “always” or “periodically” ask patients about their smoking status, 251 (86{\%}) “seldom” or “never” ask patients about secondhand smoke exposure, 245 (84{\%}) “always” or “periodically” educate patients about ocular diseases associated with smoking, 142 (49{\%}) “seldom” or “never” ask patients who smoke about their willingness to quit smoking, and 249 (85{\%}) “seldom” or “never” discuss potential methods and resources to assist with smoking cessation. Conclusions Most eye care providers assess patients' smoking status and educate patients regarding ocular risks of smoking. However, approximately half do not ask, or seldom ask, about patients' willingness to quit smoking, and most do not discuss smoking cessation options.",
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Practice Patterns Among Eye Care Providers at US Teaching Hospitals With Regard to Assessing and Educating Patients About Smoking. / Landis, Zachary C.; Rolius, Ramunas; Scott, Ingrid U.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 180, 08.2017, p. 86-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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