Pre-procedural antibiotics for endoscopic urological procedures: Initial experience in individuals with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic bacteriuria

Julio T. Chong, Adam P. Klausner, Albert Petrossian, Michael D. Byrne, Jewel R. Moore, Lance L. Goetz, David R. Gater, B. Mayer Grob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the safety, efficacy, quality-of-life impact, and costs of a single dose or a longer course of pre-procedural antibiotics prior to elective endoscopic urological procedures in individuals with spinal cord injury and disorders (SCI/D) and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Design: A prospective observational study. Setting: Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Participants: Sixty persons with SCI/D and asymptomatic bacteriuria scheduled to undergo elective endoscopic urological procedures. Interventions: A single pre-procedural dose of antibiotics vs. a 3-5-day course of pre-procedural antibiotics. Outcome measures: Objective and subjective measures of health, costs, and quality of life. Results: There were no significant differences in vital signs, leukocytosis, adverse events, and overall satisfaction in individuals who received short-course vs. long-course antibiotics. There was a significant decrease in antibiotic cost (33.1 ± 47.6 vs. 3.6 ± 6.1 US$, P = 0.01) for individuals in the short-course group. In addition, there was greater pre-procedural anxiety (18 vs. 0%, P < 0.05) for individuals who received long-course antibiotics. Conclusion: SCI/D individuals with asymptomatic bacteriuria may be able to safely undergo most endoscopic urological procedures with a single dose of pre-procedural antibiotics. However, further research is required and even appropriate pre-procedural antibiotics may not prevent severe infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Bacteriuria
Spinal Cord Injuries
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Spinal Cord Diseases
Quality of Life
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Vital Signs
Leukocytosis
Veterans
Health Care Costs
Observational Studies
Anxiety
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Safety
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Chong, Julio T. ; Klausner, Adam P. ; Petrossian, Albert ; Byrne, Michael D. ; Moore, Jewel R. ; Goetz, Lance L. ; Gater, David R. ; Grob, B. Mayer. / Pre-procedural antibiotics for endoscopic urological procedures : Initial experience in individuals with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic bacteriuria. In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 187-192.
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Pre-procedural antibiotics for endoscopic urological procedures : Initial experience in individuals with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic bacteriuria. / Chong, Julio T.; Klausner, Adam P.; Petrossian, Albert; Byrne, Michael D.; Moore, Jewel R.; Goetz, Lance L.; Gater, David R.; Grob, B. Mayer.

In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 187-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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