Preconceptional health: Risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes by reproductive life stage in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS)

Carol S. Weisman, Marianne M. Hillemeier, Gary A. Chase, Anne Marie Dyer, Sara A. Baker, Mark Feinberg, Danielle Symons Downs, Roxanne L. Parrott, Heather K. Cecil, John J. Botti, Colin MacNeill, Cynthia H. Chuang, Berwood Yost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study used population-based data to examine how health status and risks vary by reproductive life stage, with particular focus on the proximal risks for preterm birth and low birthweight (LBW) infants in preconceptional and interconceptional women. Data are from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS), which included a telephone survey of a representative sample of 2,002 women ages 18-45 years residing in largely rural central Pennsylvania. Women were classified according to reproductive stage-preconceptional, interconceptional, and postconceptional-on the basis of pregnancy history and reproductive capacity. Multiple indicators of health status and health risks were examined by reproductive stage, stratified by age group (ages 18-34 and ages 35-45). Results show that many risk factors varied significantly by reproductive stage and by age group within reproductive stage. Preconceptional and interconceptional women exhibited several unhealthy behaviors (e.g., binge drinking, nutritional deficits, physical inactivity). Younger pre- and interconceptional women (ages 18-34) had more gynecologic infections, some less favorable health behaviors, and more psychosocial stress than older women (ages 35-45) in the same reproductive stages. Older preconceptional women were more likely to have chronic conditions (hypertension, high cholesterol) than younger preconceptional women. Results suggest how interventions could be tailored to women's reproductive stages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-224
Number of pages9
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Pregnancy Outcome
health risk
pregnancy
Health
health
health status
age group
Age Groups
Health Status Indicators
Binge Drinking
Reproductive History
Health Behavior
Premature Birth
Telephone
hypertension
Health Status
health behavior
telephone
infant

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

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title = "Preconceptional health: Risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes by reproductive life stage in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS)",
abstract = "This study used population-based data to examine how health status and risks vary by reproductive life stage, with particular focus on the proximal risks for preterm birth and low birthweight (LBW) infants in preconceptional and interconceptional women. Data are from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS), which included a telephone survey of a representative sample of 2,002 women ages 18-45 years residing in largely rural central Pennsylvania. Women were classified according to reproductive stage-preconceptional, interconceptional, and postconceptional-on the basis of pregnancy history and reproductive capacity. Multiple indicators of health status and health risks were examined by reproductive stage, stratified by age group (ages 18-34 and ages 35-45). Results show that many risk factors varied significantly by reproductive stage and by age group within reproductive stage. Preconceptional and interconceptional women exhibited several unhealthy behaviors (e.g., binge drinking, nutritional deficits, physical inactivity). Younger pre- and interconceptional women (ages 18-34) had more gynecologic infections, some less favorable health behaviors, and more psychosocial stress than older women (ages 35-45) in the same reproductive stages. Older preconceptional women were more likely to have chronic conditions (hypertension, high cholesterol) than younger preconceptional women. Results suggest how interventions could be tailored to women's reproductive stages.",
author = "Weisman, {Carol S.} and Hillemeier, {Marianne M.} and Chase, {Gary A.} and Dyer, {Anne Marie} and Baker, {Sara A.} and Mark Feinberg and {Symons Downs}, Danielle and Parrott, {Roxanne L.} and Cecil, {Heather K.} and Botti, {John J.} and Colin MacNeill and Chuang, {Cynthia H.} and Berwood Yost",
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Preconceptional health : Risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes by reproductive life stage in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS). / Weisman, Carol S.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Chase, Gary A.; Dyer, Anne Marie; Baker, Sara A.; Feinberg, Mark; Symons Downs, Danielle; Parrott, Roxanne L.; Cecil, Heather K.; Botti, John J.; MacNeill, Colin; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Yost, Berwood.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.07.2006, p. 216-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes by reproductive life stage in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS)

AU - Weisman, Carol S.

AU - Hillemeier, Marianne M.

AU - Chase, Gary A.

AU - Dyer, Anne Marie

AU - Baker, Sara A.

AU - Feinberg, Mark

AU - Symons Downs, Danielle

AU - Parrott, Roxanne L.

AU - Cecil, Heather K.

AU - Botti, John J.

AU - MacNeill, Colin

AU - Chuang, Cynthia H.

AU - Yost, Berwood

PY - 2006/7/1

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N2 - This study used population-based data to examine how health status and risks vary by reproductive life stage, with particular focus on the proximal risks for preterm birth and low birthweight (LBW) infants in preconceptional and interconceptional women. Data are from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS), which included a telephone survey of a representative sample of 2,002 women ages 18-45 years residing in largely rural central Pennsylvania. Women were classified according to reproductive stage-preconceptional, interconceptional, and postconceptional-on the basis of pregnancy history and reproductive capacity. Multiple indicators of health status and health risks were examined by reproductive stage, stratified by age group (ages 18-34 and ages 35-45). Results show that many risk factors varied significantly by reproductive stage and by age group within reproductive stage. Preconceptional and interconceptional women exhibited several unhealthy behaviors (e.g., binge drinking, nutritional deficits, physical inactivity). Younger pre- and interconceptional women (ages 18-34) had more gynecologic infections, some less favorable health behaviors, and more psychosocial stress than older women (ages 35-45) in the same reproductive stages. Older preconceptional women were more likely to have chronic conditions (hypertension, high cholesterol) than younger preconceptional women. Results suggest how interventions could be tailored to women's reproductive stages.

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