PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature

Robert C. Fromuth, Matthew B. Parkinson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Designing for human variability frequently necessitates an estimation of the spatial requirements of the intended user population. These measures are often obtained from "proportionality constants " which predict the lengths of relevant anthropometry using stature. This approach is attractive because it is readily adapted to new populations-only knowledge of a single input, stature, is necessary to obtain the estimates. The most commonly used ratios are those presented in Drillis and Contini's report from 1966 [1]. Despite the prevalence of their use, these particular values are limited because the size and diversity of the population from which these ratios were derived is not in the literature, and the actual body dimensions that each ratio represents are not clear. Furthermore, they are often misinterpreted and used inappropriately. This paper introduces a new approach, the "boundary ratio" which mitigates many of these issues. Boundary ratios improve on the traditional application of proportionality constants by: 1) explicitly defining the body dimensions, 2) defining constants for the 5th, 50 th, and 95th percentile measures, and 3) providing distinct constants for males and females when necessary. This approach is shown to better model the range of variability exhibited in population body dimensions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008
Pages582-589
Number of pages8
EditionPART A
StatePublished - Nov 23 2009
Event2008 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008 - New York City, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 3 2008Aug 6 2008

Publication series

Name2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008
NumberPART A
Volume1

Other

Other2008 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York City, NY
Period8/3/088/6/08

Fingerprint

Anthropometry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Fromuth, R. C., & Parkinson, M. B. (2009). PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature. In 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008 (PART A ed., pp. 582-589). (2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008; Vol. 1, No. PART A).
Fromuth, Robert C. ; Parkinson, Matthew B. / PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature. 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008. PART A. ed. 2009. pp. 582-589 (2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008; PART A).
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Fromuth, RC & Parkinson, MB 2009, PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature. in 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008. PART A edn, 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008, no. PART A, vol. 1, pp. 582-589, 2008 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008, New York City, NY, United States, 8/3/08.

PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature. / Fromuth, Robert C.; Parkinson, Matthew B.

2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008. PART A. ed. 2009. p. 582-589 (2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008; Vol. 1, No. PART A).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Fromuth RC, Parkinson MB. PREDICTING 5th and 95th percentile anthropometric segment lengths from population stature. In 2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008. PART A ed. 2009. p. 582-589. (2008 Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, DETC 2008; PART A).