Prediction of externalizing behavior problems from early to middle childhood: The role of parental socialization and emotion expression

Susanne A. Denham, Elizabeth Workman, Pamela Marie Cole, Carol Weissbrod, Kimberly T. Kendziora, Carolyn Zahn-Waxler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

305 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parental emotions and behaviors that contribute to continuity and change in preschool children's externalizing problems were examined. Mothers and fathers were observed interacting with their children, and child-rearing styles were reported. Teachers, mothers, and children reported children's antisocial, oppositional behavior. Externalizing problems showed strong continuity 2 and 4 years later. Proactive parenting (i.e., supportive presence, clear instruction, and limit setting) predicted fewer behavior problems over time, after controlling for initial problems; the converse was true for parental anger. In contrast, the hypothesized ameliorative contribution of parents' positive emotion was not found. Parental contributions were most influential for children whose initial problems were in the clinical range. In particular, parental anger predicted continuation of problems over time. Paternal, as well as maternal, influences were identified. Examination of parental emotions and inclusion of fathers is important to research and intervention with young antisocial children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-45
Number of pages23
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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