Predictive factors for prolonged hospital stay in pediatric tonsillectomy patients

Dhave Setabutr, Hetal Patel, Garret Choby, Michele Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine factors that may potentially predict a prolonged hospital stay after scheduled tonsillectomy in the pediatric population. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Subjects and Methods: A review of pediatric patients who had undergone a tonsillectomy at a tertiary medical center from July 2007 to November 2010 was made. Preoperative variables were analyzed to determine predictors of prolonged hospital stay (defined as >24 h) that may have influenced their length of stay. Setting: Tertiary care medical center. Results: 827 patient charts were reviewed. One hundred and one patients (12.2 %) had hospital stays >24 h. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea (69.2 %), tonsillitis (13.8 %), and tonsillar asymmetry (0.9 %). Seventy-seven (76.2 %) patients of the extended stay group had a delayed discharge because of poor oral intake. Fever and respiratory complications accounted for 0.5 and 1.8 % respectively of those patients who had extended stays. Patients with extended stays were younger (p < 0.001) and weighed less (p < 0.001). Patients with a history of sickle cell crises, reactive airway disease, bronchodilator use, and anti-reflux medication use (p < 0.05) were more likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: Factors from the history and physical of pediatric patients may predict which children are at higher risk for extended hospital stays after routine tonsillectomy. Predictors of extended stays include those under the age of four and children weighing <20 kg, those with a history of sickle cell crises or reactive airway disease, and those using bronchodilators or anti-reflux medication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1775-1781
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Volume270
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Fingerprint

Tonsillectomy
Length of Stay
Pediatrics
Bronchodilator Agents
Tonsillitis
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Tertiary Care Centers
Fever
Retrospective Studies
History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Setabutr, Dhave ; Patel, Hetal ; Choby, Garret ; Carr, Michele. / Predictive factors for prolonged hospital stay in pediatric tonsillectomy patients. In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology. 2013 ; Vol. 270, No. 6. pp. 1775-1781.
@article{d9b00dcce8dc442781c301147e52c8fe,
title = "Predictive factors for prolonged hospital stay in pediatric tonsillectomy patients",
abstract = "Objective: To determine factors that may potentially predict a prolonged hospital stay after scheduled tonsillectomy in the pediatric population. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Subjects and Methods: A review of pediatric patients who had undergone a tonsillectomy at a tertiary medical center from July 2007 to November 2010 was made. Preoperative variables were analyzed to determine predictors of prolonged hospital stay (defined as >24 h) that may have influenced their length of stay. Setting: Tertiary care medical center. Results: 827 patient charts were reviewed. One hundred and one patients (12.2 {\%}) had hospital stays >24 h. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea (69.2 {\%}), tonsillitis (13.8 {\%}), and tonsillar asymmetry (0.9 {\%}). Seventy-seven (76.2 {\%}) patients of the extended stay group had a delayed discharge because of poor oral intake. Fever and respiratory complications accounted for 0.5 and 1.8 {\%} respectively of those patients who had extended stays. Patients with extended stays were younger (p < 0.001) and weighed less (p < 0.001). Patients with a history of sickle cell crises, reactive airway disease, bronchodilator use, and anti-reflux medication use (p < 0.05) were more likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: Factors from the history and physical of pediatric patients may predict which children are at higher risk for extended hospital stays after routine tonsillectomy. Predictors of extended stays include those under the age of four and children weighing <20 kg, those with a history of sickle cell crises or reactive airway disease, and those using bronchodilators or anti-reflux medication.",
author = "Dhave Setabutr and Hetal Patel and Garret Choby and Michele Carr",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00405-012-2188-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "270",
pages = "1775--1781",
journal = "European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology",
issn = "0937-4477",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "6",

}

Predictive factors for prolonged hospital stay in pediatric tonsillectomy patients. / Setabutr, Dhave; Patel, Hetal; Choby, Garret; Carr, Michele.

In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Vol. 270, No. 6, 01.05.2013, p. 1775-1781.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictive factors for prolonged hospital stay in pediatric tonsillectomy patients

AU - Setabutr, Dhave

AU - Patel, Hetal

AU - Choby, Garret

AU - Carr, Michele

PY - 2013/5/1

Y1 - 2013/5/1

N2 - Objective: To determine factors that may potentially predict a prolonged hospital stay after scheduled tonsillectomy in the pediatric population. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Subjects and Methods: A review of pediatric patients who had undergone a tonsillectomy at a tertiary medical center from July 2007 to November 2010 was made. Preoperative variables were analyzed to determine predictors of prolonged hospital stay (defined as >24 h) that may have influenced their length of stay. Setting: Tertiary care medical center. Results: 827 patient charts were reviewed. One hundred and one patients (12.2 %) had hospital stays >24 h. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea (69.2 %), tonsillitis (13.8 %), and tonsillar asymmetry (0.9 %). Seventy-seven (76.2 %) patients of the extended stay group had a delayed discharge because of poor oral intake. Fever and respiratory complications accounted for 0.5 and 1.8 % respectively of those patients who had extended stays. Patients with extended stays were younger (p < 0.001) and weighed less (p < 0.001). Patients with a history of sickle cell crises, reactive airway disease, bronchodilator use, and anti-reflux medication use (p < 0.05) were more likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: Factors from the history and physical of pediatric patients may predict which children are at higher risk for extended hospital stays after routine tonsillectomy. Predictors of extended stays include those under the age of four and children weighing <20 kg, those with a history of sickle cell crises or reactive airway disease, and those using bronchodilators or anti-reflux medication.

AB - Objective: To determine factors that may potentially predict a prolonged hospital stay after scheduled tonsillectomy in the pediatric population. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Subjects and Methods: A review of pediatric patients who had undergone a tonsillectomy at a tertiary medical center from July 2007 to November 2010 was made. Preoperative variables were analyzed to determine predictors of prolonged hospital stay (defined as >24 h) that may have influenced their length of stay. Setting: Tertiary care medical center. Results: 827 patient charts were reviewed. One hundred and one patients (12.2 %) had hospital stays >24 h. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea (69.2 %), tonsillitis (13.8 %), and tonsillar asymmetry (0.9 %). Seventy-seven (76.2 %) patients of the extended stay group had a delayed discharge because of poor oral intake. Fever and respiratory complications accounted for 0.5 and 1.8 % respectively of those patients who had extended stays. Patients with extended stays were younger (p < 0.001) and weighed less (p < 0.001). Patients with a history of sickle cell crises, reactive airway disease, bronchodilator use, and anti-reflux medication use (p < 0.05) were more likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: Factors from the history and physical of pediatric patients may predict which children are at higher risk for extended hospital stays after routine tonsillectomy. Predictors of extended stays include those under the age of four and children weighing <20 kg, those with a history of sickle cell crises or reactive airway disease, and those using bronchodilators or anti-reflux medication.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877876712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84877876712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00405-012-2188-z

DO - 10.1007/s00405-012-2188-z

M3 - Review article

C2 - 23001435

AN - SCOPUS:84877876712

VL - 270

SP - 1775

EP - 1781

JO - European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

JF - European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

SN - 0937-4477

IS - 6

ER -