Predictive value for infection of febrile morbidity after vaginal surgery

D. Paul Shackelford, M. K. Huffman, Matthew Davies, P. F. Kaminski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the screening value of febrile morbidity for detecting infections after vaginal surgery. Methods: A cohort of 431 consecutive women had vaginal surgery at the M. S. Hershey Medical Center from September 1988 through June 1995. Outcomes of febrile morbidity and infection were analyzed. Results: Fifty-four of 431 patients (12.5%) had febrile morbidity. Thirty-five infections (8.1%) were identified, of which only 13 were accompanied by febrile morbidity. Forty-one patients (9.5%) had unexplained fevers. The sensitivity of febrile morbidity for postoperative infection was 40%, specificity was 98%, positive predictive value was 26%, and negative predictive value was 94%. Stepwise logistic regression found blood loss (odds ratio 1.001/mL; confidence interval 1.0001-1.0035), uterine weight (0.987/g; 0.976-0.999), and parity (1.570; 1.146-2.050) as significant independent variables for developing fever. Patient weight (0.984/lb; 0,971- 0.998) and type of procedure (2.16; 2.12-6.38) were confirmed as significant independent variables for postsurgical infections. Conclusion: Febrile morbidity had limited value as a screening test for postoperative infection, with poor sensitivity and positive predictive value after vaginal surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)928-931
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 1999

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Fever
Morbidity
Infection
Weights and Measures
Parity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Paul Shackelford, D. ; Huffman, M. K. ; Davies, Matthew ; Kaminski, P. F. / Predictive value for infection of febrile morbidity after vaginal surgery. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1999 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 928-931.
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Predictive value for infection of febrile morbidity after vaginal surgery. / Paul Shackelford, D.; Huffman, M. K.; Davies, Matthew; Kaminski, P. F.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 93, No. 6, 07.06.1999, p. 928-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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