Predictors of Attrition and Response in Cognitive Processing Therapy for Interpersonal Trauma Survivors with PTSD

Sophie E. Haven, Wilson J. Brown, Jillian B. Berfield, Steven E. Bruce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

With the establishment of empirically validated treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), concerns remain regarding the effectiveness of such treatments in real-world clinical settings. Specifically, premature termination and treatment response limit the effectiveness of these interventions. The current study investigated factors potentially related to premature termination and treatment response in Cognitive Processing Therapy with Account (CPT-A). Participants in this study included 42 women (Mage = 30.70 SDage = 9.40) with PTSD from exposure to interpersonal trauma. Demographic characteristics, pre-treatment symptoms of PTSD and depression, and transdiagnostic factors were examined as predictors of attrition and treatment response. Hierarchical regression and logistic regression models were analyzed to test the variance explained and predictive value of these factors. The present study revealed that age was a significant factor related to dropout from CPT-A whereas baseline PTSD symptom severity was significantly related to treatment response. Results of this study suggest the importance of the interrelationships among pre-treatment predictors as well as the consideration of attrition and treatment response as distinct metrics of treatment outcome. Further, these results inform the application of CPT-A for PTSD in survivors of interpersonal trauma, as consideration of the identified predictors of dropout and non-response at intake may contribute to treatment retention and response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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