Predictors of motivation to change in mandated college students following a referral incident

David Qi, Matthew R. Pearson, John T.P. Hustad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of present study was to understand factors that are related to a desire or motivation to change (MTC) alcohol use in a sample of college students mandated to receive an alcohol intervention. We examined characteristics of and reactions to the referral event, typical alcohol use involvement, and alcohol beliefs about the perceived importance of drinking in college assessed by the College Life Alcohol Salience Scale (CLASS; Osberg et al., 2010) as predictors of MTC following referral to an alcohol intervention. College students (N = 932) who presented for a mandatory alcohol intervention following a referral event (e.g., citation for underage drinking, medical attention for an alcohol-related incident, or driving under the influence) completed an assessment prior to receiving an alcohol intervention. Higher perceived aversiveness of the referral event and higher personal responsibility one felt for the occurrence of the event were positively related to higher MTC. Although alcohol beliefs about the role of drinking in college were not significantly related to either event aversiveness or responsibility, it was negatively related to MTC even after controlling for alcohol use involvement variables. Alcohol beliefs about the role of drinking in college represent an important construct that is related to increased alcohol use and alcohol-related problems and decreased MTC in a sample of college students. Interventions aimed at reducing alcohol beliefs about the role of drinking in college may be an effective strategy to reduce alcohol use and alcohol-related problems by college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-531
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

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Motivation
Referral and Consultation
Alcohols
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Predictors of motivation to change in mandated college students following a referral incident. / Qi, David; Pearson, Matthew R.; Hustad, John T.P.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 28, No. 2, 06.2014, p. 524-531.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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