Predictors of Parenting Stress Among Gay Adoptive Fathers in the United States

Samantha L. Tornello, Rachel H. Farr, Charlotte J. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined correlates of parenting stress among 230 gay adoptive fathers across the United States through an Internet survey. As with previous research on adoptive parents, results showed that fathers with less social support, older children, and children who were adopted at older ages reported more parenting stress. Moreover, gay fathers who had a less positive gay identity also reported more parenting stress. These 4 variables accounted for 33% of the variance in parenting stress; effect sizes were medium to large. Our results suggest the importance of social support and a positive gay identity in facilitating successful parenting outcomes among gay adoptive fathers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-600
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Parenting
Fathers
Social Support
Internet
Parents
Sexual Minorities
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Tornello, Samantha L. ; Farr, Rachel H. ; Patterson, Charlotte J. / Predictors of Parenting Stress Among Gay Adoptive Fathers in the United States. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 591-600.
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Predictors of Parenting Stress Among Gay Adoptive Fathers in the United States. / Tornello, Samantha L.; Farr, Rachel H.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.08.2011, p. 591-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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