Predictors of willingness to participate in biospecimen donation and biobanking among appalachian adults

Adana A.M. Llanos, Gregory S. Young, Ryan Baltic, Eugene Lengerich, Betsy B. Aumiller, Mark B. Dignan, Electra D. Paskett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Rural residents in the U.S., particularly residents of Appalachia, are underrepresented in biomedical research, limiting the generalizability of research findings. Objective. To examine factors associated with Appalachian adults’ willingness to participate in biospecimen donation and banking. Methods. A survey assessing willingness to donate blood, saliva, and buccal specimens and to have these biospecimens stored for future use in genetic studies was conducted among 493 Appalachian adults. Results. Most participants 73% (358/493) were willing to donate one or more biospecimen type; among them, 75% (268/358) were willing to donate blood, saliva, and buccal specimens. Approximately 61% (300/493) were willing to have their biospecimens banked and 97% (290/300) of these were willing to have their samples used for genetic studies. Appalachian self- identity predicted willingness to donate biospecimens, to have them stored, and used in genetic studies (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.03–2.24). Conclusions. Appalachian adults were generally willing to participate in biobanking research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-766
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Appalachian Region
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Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Llanos, Adana A.M. ; Young, Gregory S. ; Baltic, Ryan ; Lengerich, Eugene ; Aumiller, Betsy B. ; Dignan, Mark B. ; Paskett, Electra D. / Predictors of willingness to participate in biospecimen donation and biobanking among appalachian adults. In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 743-766.
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abstract = "Background. Rural residents in the U.S., particularly residents of Appalachia, are underrepresented in biomedical research, limiting the generalizability of research findings. Objective. To examine factors associated with Appalachian adults’ willingness to participate in biospecimen donation and banking. Methods. A survey assessing willingness to donate blood, saliva, and buccal specimens and to have these biospecimens stored for future use in genetic studies was conducted among 493 Appalachian adults. Results. Most participants 73{\%} (358/493) were willing to donate one or more biospecimen type; among them, 75{\%} (268/358) were willing to donate blood, saliva, and buccal specimens. Approximately 61{\%} (300/493) were willing to have their biospecimens banked and 97{\%} (290/300) of these were willing to have their samples used for genetic studies. Appalachian self- identity predicted willingness to donate biospecimens, to have them stored, and used in genetic studies (OR 1.52, 95{\%} CI 1.03–2.24). Conclusions. Appalachian adults were generally willing to participate in biobanking research.",
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Predictors of willingness to participate in biospecimen donation and biobanking among appalachian adults. / Llanos, Adana A.M.; Young, Gregory S.; Baltic, Ryan; Lengerich, Eugene; Aumiller, Betsy B.; Dignan, Mark B.; Paskett, Electra D.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.05.2018, p. 743-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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