Preferences, Proximity, and Controlled Choice: Examining Families’ School Choices and Enrollment Decisions in Louisville, Kentucky

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Abstract

This study provides evidence studying one diverse, countywide district’s integration efforts utilizing school choice and parental preferences. The findings illustrate substantial differences about the way in which the district’s student assignment policy affects students. In particular, this choice-based integration policy with a weak geographic preference still advantages those who choose their nearest schools as well as white students and those living in more advantaged areas. Examining differences in families’ school preferences, whether students are assigned to their preferred school, and whether and where students enroll in schools illustrates how an integration-focused assignment policy can still result in segregation and inequality. Yet, by illustrating the many influences on family preferences beyond proximity, it also suggests the opportunity for using assignment policy to overcome persistent neighborhood segregation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-394
Number of pages17
JournalPeabody Journal of Education
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2018

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school enrollment
school choice
Students
student
school
segregation
district
integration policy
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "This study provides evidence studying one diverse, countywide district’s integration efforts utilizing school choice and parental preferences. The findings illustrate substantial differences about the way in which the district’s student assignment policy affects students. In particular, this choice-based integration policy with a weak geographic preference still advantages those who choose their nearest schools as well as white students and those living in more advantaged areas. Examining differences in families’ school preferences, whether students are assigned to their preferred school, and whether and where students enroll in schools illustrates how an integration-focused assignment policy can still result in segregation and inequality. Yet, by illustrating the many influences on family preferences beyond proximity, it also suggests the opportunity for using assignment policy to overcome persistent neighborhood segregation.",
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