Preliminary study of self-reported experience of physical aggression and bullying of boys who stutter: Relation to increased anxiety

Gordon W. Blood, Ingrid M. Blood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of self-reported anxiety and vulnerability to bullying for 18 children who stuttered and 18 children who did not stutter. More children who stuttered were at significantly higher risk of experiencing bullying behavior (61%) than children who did not stutter (22%); 39% of children who stuttered scored at least one standard deviation above the mean on the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, suggestive of higher anxiety. In contrast, only 6% of children who did not stutter scored at least one standard deviation above the mean. The correlation was .82 for children who stuttered between greater vulnerability to bullying and self-reported anxiety. A bidirectional relationship is hypothesized between high anxiety and bullying of children who stutter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1060-1066
Number of pages7
JournalPerceptual and motor skills
Volume104
Issue number3 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

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