Prenatal and postnatal cigarette and cannabis exposure: Effects on Secretory Immunoglobulin A in early childhood

Danielle S. Molnar, Douglas A. Granger, Shannon Shisler, Rina Das Eiden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) plays a critical role in immune functioning by preventing pathogens from adhering to epithelial mucosa. Most infectious agents enter the body via mucosal surfaces, thus SIgA serves in the defense against respiratory, intestinal, and urinogenitary infections, as well as periodontal disease and caries. This study examined the possibility that pre- and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis is associated with individual differences in Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in early childhood. Methods: Participants were 50 mother/infant (29 boys; 35% Caucasian) dyads recruited at their first prenatal appointment in a large northeastern community hospital in the United States. Repeated assessments of pre- and postnatal cigarette and cannabis were conducted beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy, using multiple methods (i.e., saliva, meconium, self-report). Infants were grouped into those prenatally exposed to either cigarette only (n = 19), cigarette and cannabis (n = 19), or with no prenatal substance exposure (n = 12). At age 5 years, the children's saliva was collected and assayed for SIgA. Results: There were group differences in SIgA levels as a function of prenatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis – children in the cigarette only and the cigarette and cannabis groups had higher SIgA levels compared to the non-exposed children. Children who experienced the combination of postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis had higher levels of SIgA, even after accounting for prenatal exposures and other covariates relevant to immune system functioning. Conclusions: Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis may be associated with hyperactivity of mucosal immunity in early childhood. Links between cigarette and cannabis exposure and health problems in early childhood may be partially explained by prenatal and postnatal exposure-related changes in mucosal immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-36
Number of pages6
JournalNeurotoxicology and Teratology
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Secretory Immunoglobulin A
Cannabis
Tobacco Products
Mucosal Immunity
Saliva
Meconium
Immune system
Community Hospital
Periodontal Diseases
Pathogens
First Pregnancy Trimester
Medical problems
Individuality
Self Report
Immune System
Appointments and Schedules
Mucous Membrane
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{0005798d2b5e4a44af7a3126d6e0f0e2,
title = "Prenatal and postnatal cigarette and cannabis exposure: Effects on Secretory Immunoglobulin A in early childhood",
abstract = "Aims: Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) plays a critical role in immune functioning by preventing pathogens from adhering to epithelial mucosa. Most infectious agents enter the body via mucosal surfaces, thus SIgA serves in the defense against respiratory, intestinal, and urinogenitary infections, as well as periodontal disease and caries. This study examined the possibility that pre- and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis is associated with individual differences in Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in early childhood. Methods: Participants were 50 mother/infant (29 boys; 35{\%} Caucasian) dyads recruited at their first prenatal appointment in a large northeastern community hospital in the United States. Repeated assessments of pre- and postnatal cigarette and cannabis were conducted beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy, using multiple methods (i.e., saliva, meconium, self-report). Infants were grouped into those prenatally exposed to either cigarette only (n = 19), cigarette and cannabis (n = 19), or with no prenatal substance exposure (n = 12). At age 5 years, the children's saliva was collected and assayed for SIgA. Results: There were group differences in SIgA levels as a function of prenatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis – children in the cigarette only and the cigarette and cannabis groups had higher SIgA levels compared to the non-exposed children. Children who experienced the combination of postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis had higher levels of SIgA, even after accounting for prenatal exposures and other covariates relevant to immune system functioning. Conclusions: Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis may be associated with hyperactivity of mucosal immunity in early childhood. Links between cigarette and cannabis exposure and health problems in early childhood may be partially explained by prenatal and postnatal exposure-related changes in mucosal immunity.",
author = "Molnar, {Danielle S.} and Granger, {Douglas A.} and Shannon Shisler and {Das Eiden}, Rina",
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Prenatal and postnatal cigarette and cannabis exposure : Effects on Secretory Immunoglobulin A in early childhood. / Molnar, Danielle S.; Granger, Douglas A.; Shisler, Shannon; Das Eiden, Rina.

In: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, Vol. 67, 01.05.2018, p. 31-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal and postnatal cigarette and cannabis exposure

T2 - Effects on Secretory Immunoglobulin A in early childhood

AU - Molnar, Danielle S.

AU - Granger, Douglas A.

AU - Shisler, Shannon

AU - Das Eiden, Rina

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Aims: Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) plays a critical role in immune functioning by preventing pathogens from adhering to epithelial mucosa. Most infectious agents enter the body via mucosal surfaces, thus SIgA serves in the defense against respiratory, intestinal, and urinogenitary infections, as well as periodontal disease and caries. This study examined the possibility that pre- and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis is associated with individual differences in Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in early childhood. Methods: Participants were 50 mother/infant (29 boys; 35% Caucasian) dyads recruited at their first prenatal appointment in a large northeastern community hospital in the United States. Repeated assessments of pre- and postnatal cigarette and cannabis were conducted beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy, using multiple methods (i.e., saliva, meconium, self-report). Infants were grouped into those prenatally exposed to either cigarette only (n = 19), cigarette and cannabis (n = 19), or with no prenatal substance exposure (n = 12). At age 5 years, the children's saliva was collected and assayed for SIgA. Results: There were group differences in SIgA levels as a function of prenatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis – children in the cigarette only and the cigarette and cannabis groups had higher SIgA levels compared to the non-exposed children. Children who experienced the combination of postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis had higher levels of SIgA, even after accounting for prenatal exposures and other covariates relevant to immune system functioning. Conclusions: Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis may be associated with hyperactivity of mucosal immunity in early childhood. Links between cigarette and cannabis exposure and health problems in early childhood may be partially explained by prenatal and postnatal exposure-related changes in mucosal immunity.

AB - Aims: Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) plays a critical role in immune functioning by preventing pathogens from adhering to epithelial mucosa. Most infectious agents enter the body via mucosal surfaces, thus SIgA serves in the defense against respiratory, intestinal, and urinogenitary infections, as well as periodontal disease and caries. This study examined the possibility that pre- and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis is associated with individual differences in Secretory Immunoglobulin A (SIgA) levels in early childhood. Methods: Participants were 50 mother/infant (29 boys; 35% Caucasian) dyads recruited at their first prenatal appointment in a large northeastern community hospital in the United States. Repeated assessments of pre- and postnatal cigarette and cannabis were conducted beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy, using multiple methods (i.e., saliva, meconium, self-report). Infants were grouped into those prenatally exposed to either cigarette only (n = 19), cigarette and cannabis (n = 19), or with no prenatal substance exposure (n = 12). At age 5 years, the children's saliva was collected and assayed for SIgA. Results: There were group differences in SIgA levels as a function of prenatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis – children in the cigarette only and the cigarette and cannabis groups had higher SIgA levels compared to the non-exposed children. Children who experienced the combination of postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis had higher levels of SIgA, even after accounting for prenatal exposures and other covariates relevant to immune system functioning. Conclusions: Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cigarette and cannabis may be associated with hyperactivity of mucosal immunity in early childhood. Links between cigarette and cannabis exposure and health problems in early childhood may be partially explained by prenatal and postnatal exposure-related changes in mucosal immunity.

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