Prenatal cocaine exposure differentially affects stress responses in girls and boys: Associations with future substance use

Tara M. Chaplin, Kari Jeanne Visconti, Peter J. Molfese, Elizabeth J. Susman, Laura Klein, Rajita Sinha, Linda C. Mayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prenatal cocaine exposure may affect developing stress response systems in youth, potentially creating risk for substance use in adolescence. Further, pathways from prenatal risk to future substance use may differ for girls versus boys. The present longitudinal study examined multiple biobehavioral measures, including heart rate, blood pressure, emotion, and salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase (sAA), in response to a stressor in 193 low-income 14-to 17-year-olds, half of whom were prenatally cocaine exposed (PCE). Youth's lifetime substance use was assessed with self-report, interview, and urine toxicology/breathalyzer at Time 1 and at Time 2 (6-12 months later). PCE × Gender interactions were found predicting anxiety, anger, and sadness responses to the stressor, with PCE girls showing heightened responses as compared to PCE boys on these indicators. Stress Response × Gender interactions were found predicting Time 2 substance use in youth (controlling for Time 1 use) for sAA and sadness; for girls, heightened sadness responses predicted substance use, but for boys, dampened sAA responses predicted substance use. Findings suggest distinct biobehavioral stress response risk profiles for boys and girls, with heightened arousal for girls and blunted arousal for boys associated with prenatal risk and future substance use outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-180
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2014

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Cocaine
Salivary alpha-Amylases
Arousal
Anger
Toxicology
Self Report
Longitudinal Studies
Hydrocortisone
Emotions
Anxiety
Heart Rate
Urine
Interviews
Blood Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Chaplin, Tara M. ; Visconti, Kari Jeanne ; Molfese, Peter J. ; Susman, Elizabeth J. ; Klein, Laura ; Sinha, Rajita ; Mayes, Linda C. / Prenatal cocaine exposure differentially affects stress responses in girls and boys : Associations with future substance use. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 163-180.
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Prenatal cocaine exposure differentially affects stress responses in girls and boys : Associations with future substance use. / Chaplin, Tara M.; Visconti, Kari Jeanne; Molfese, Peter J.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Klein, Laura; Sinha, Rajita; Mayes, Linda C.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 08.07.2014, p. 163-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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