Prenatal exposure to β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and risk of autism spectrum disorders

Lisa A. Croen, Susan L. Connors, Marilyn Matevia, Yinge Qian, Craig Newschaffer, Andrew W. Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to terbutaline and other β2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR) agonists and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The methodology used is a case-control study among children born from 1995 to 1999 at Kaiser Permanente Northern California hospitals. Cases (n = 291) were children with an ASD diagnosis; controls (n = 284) were children without ASDs, randomly sampled and frequency-matched to cases on sex, birth year, and delivery hospital. Exposure to B2AR agonists during 30 days prior to conception and each trimester of pregnancy was ascertained from prenatal medical records and health plan databases. The frequency of exposure to any B2AR agonist during pregnancy was similar for mothers of children with ASD and mothers of controls (18.9% vs. 14.8%, P = 0.19). Exposure to B2AR agonists other than terbutaline was not associated with an increased risk for ASDs. However, terbutaline exposure for >2 days during the third trimester was associated with more than a fourfold increased risk for ASDs independent of indication although the limited sample size resulted in an imprecise and nonsignificant effect estimate (ORadj = 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 0. 8-24. 6). This analysis does not offer evidence linking B2AR exposure in pregnancy with autism risk. However, exposure to terbutaline during the third trimester for >2 days may be associated with an increased risk of autism. Should this result be confirmed in larger samples, it would point to late pregnancy as an etiologic window of interest in autism risk factor research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-315
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Adrenergic Agonists
Terbutaline
Autistic Disorder
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Pregnancy
Mothers
Pregnancy Trimesters
Sample Size
Medical Records
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Case-Control Studies
Parturition
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Croen, Lisa A. ; Connors, Susan L. ; Matevia, Marilyn ; Qian, Yinge ; Newschaffer, Craig ; Zimmerman, Andrew W. / Prenatal exposure to β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and risk of autism spectrum disorders. In: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders. 2011 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 307-315.
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Prenatal exposure to β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and risk of autism spectrum disorders. / Croen, Lisa A.; Connors, Susan L.; Matevia, Marilyn; Qian, Yinge; Newschaffer, Craig; Zimmerman, Andrew W.

In: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.12.2011, p. 307-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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