Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age

Adam J. Spanier, Robert S. Kahn, Allen Kunselman, Richard Hornung, Yingying Xu, Antonia M. Calafat, Bruce P. Lanphear

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is routinely detected in > 90% of Americans, promotes experimental asthma in mice. The association of prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze has not been evaluated in humans. Objective: We examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze in early childhood. Methods: We measured BPA concentrations in serial maternal urine samples from a prospective birth cohort of 398 mother-infant pairs and assessed parent-reported child wheeze every 6 months for 3 years. We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to evaluate the association of prenatal urinary BPA concentration with the dichotomous outcome wheeze (wheeze over the previous 6 months). Results: Data were available for 365 children; BPA was detected in 99% of maternal urine samples during pregnancy. In multivariable analysis, a one-unit increase in log-transformed creatinine-standardized mean prenatal urinary BPA concentration was not significantly associated with child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age, but there was an interaction of BPA concentration with time (p = 0.003). Mean prenatal BPA above versus below the median was positively associated with wheeze at 6 months of age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 4.1] but not at 3 years (AOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.3, 1.1). In secondary analyses evaluating associations of each prenatal BPA concentration separately, urinary BPA concentrations measured at 16 weeks gestation were associated with wheeze (AOR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5), but BPA concentrations at 26 weeks of gestation or at birth were not. Conclusions: Mean prenatal BPA was associated with increased odds of wheeze in early life, and the effect diminished over time. Evaluating exposure at each prenatal time point demonstrated an association between wheeze from 6 months to 3 years and log-transformed BPA concentration at 16 weeks gestation only.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)916-920
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume120
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Fingerprint

Parturition
Pregnancy
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
bisphenol A
Urine
Endocrine Disruptors
Creatinine
Asthma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Spanier, A. J., Kahn, R. S., Kunselman, A., Hornung, R., Xu, Y., Calafat, A. M., & Lanphear, B. P. (2012). Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age. Environmental health perspectives, 120(6), 916-920. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104175
Spanier, Adam J. ; Kahn, Robert S. ; Kunselman, Allen ; Hornung, Richard ; Xu, Yingying ; Calafat, Antonia M. ; Lanphear, Bruce P. / Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age. In: Environmental health perspectives. 2012 ; Vol. 120, No. 6. pp. 916-920.
@article{bb88b820c19142929df9ae43f3fa00cf,
title = "Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age",
abstract = "Background: Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is routinely detected in > 90{\%} of Americans, promotes experimental asthma in mice. The association of prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze has not been evaluated in humans. Objective: We examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze in early childhood. Methods: We measured BPA concentrations in serial maternal urine samples from a prospective birth cohort of 398 mother-infant pairs and assessed parent-reported child wheeze every 6 months for 3 years. We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to evaluate the association of prenatal urinary BPA concentration with the dichotomous outcome wheeze (wheeze over the previous 6 months). Results: Data were available for 365 children; BPA was detected in 99{\%} of maternal urine samples during pregnancy. In multivariable analysis, a one-unit increase in log-transformed creatinine-standardized mean prenatal urinary BPA concentration was not significantly associated with child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age, but there was an interaction of BPA concentration with time (p = 0.003). Mean prenatal BPA above versus below the median was positively associated with wheeze at 6 months of age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.3; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 4.1] but not at 3 years (AOR = 0.6; 95{\%} CI: 0.3, 1.1). In secondary analyses evaluating associations of each prenatal BPA concentration separately, urinary BPA concentrations measured at 16 weeks gestation were associated with wheeze (AOR = 1.2; 95{\%} CI: 1.0, 1.5), but BPA concentrations at 26 weeks of gestation or at birth were not. Conclusions: Mean prenatal BPA was associated with increased odds of wheeze in early life, and the effect diminished over time. Evaluating exposure at each prenatal time point demonstrated an association between wheeze from 6 months to 3 years and log-transformed BPA concentration at 16 weeks gestation only.",
author = "Spanier, {Adam J.} and Kahn, {Robert S.} and Allen Kunselman and Richard Hornung and Yingying Xu and Calafat, {Antonia M.} and Lanphear, {Bruce P.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1289/ehp.1104175",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "916--920",
journal = "Environmental Health Perspectives",
issn = "0091-6765",
publisher = "Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services",
number = "6",

}

Spanier, AJ, Kahn, RS, Kunselman, A, Hornung, R, Xu, Y, Calafat, AM & Lanphear, BP 2012, 'Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age', Environmental health perspectives, vol. 120, no. 6, pp. 916-920. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104175

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age. / Spanier, Adam J.; Kahn, Robert S.; Kunselman, Allen; Hornung, Richard; Xu, Yingying; Calafat, Antonia M.; Lanphear, Bruce P.

In: Environmental health perspectives, Vol. 120, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 916-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age

AU - Spanier, Adam J.

AU - Kahn, Robert S.

AU - Kunselman, Allen

AU - Hornung, Richard

AU - Xu, Yingying

AU - Calafat, Antonia M.

AU - Lanphear, Bruce P.

PY - 2012/6/1

Y1 - 2012/6/1

N2 - Background: Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is routinely detected in > 90% of Americans, promotes experimental asthma in mice. The association of prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze has not been evaluated in humans. Objective: We examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze in early childhood. Methods: We measured BPA concentrations in serial maternal urine samples from a prospective birth cohort of 398 mother-infant pairs and assessed parent-reported child wheeze every 6 months for 3 years. We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to evaluate the association of prenatal urinary BPA concentration with the dichotomous outcome wheeze (wheeze over the previous 6 months). Results: Data were available for 365 children; BPA was detected in 99% of maternal urine samples during pregnancy. In multivariable analysis, a one-unit increase in log-transformed creatinine-standardized mean prenatal urinary BPA concentration was not significantly associated with child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age, but there was an interaction of BPA concentration with time (p = 0.003). Mean prenatal BPA above versus below the median was positively associated with wheeze at 6 months of age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 4.1] but not at 3 years (AOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.3, 1.1). In secondary analyses evaluating associations of each prenatal BPA concentration separately, urinary BPA concentrations measured at 16 weeks gestation were associated with wheeze (AOR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5), but BPA concentrations at 26 weeks of gestation or at birth were not. Conclusions: Mean prenatal BPA was associated with increased odds of wheeze in early life, and the effect diminished over time. Evaluating exposure at each prenatal time point demonstrated an association between wheeze from 6 months to 3 years and log-transformed BPA concentration at 16 weeks gestation only.

AB - Background: Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is routinely detected in > 90% of Americans, promotes experimental asthma in mice. The association of prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze has not been evaluated in humans. Objective: We examined the relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and wheeze in early childhood. Methods: We measured BPA concentrations in serial maternal urine samples from a prospective birth cohort of 398 mother-infant pairs and assessed parent-reported child wheeze every 6 months for 3 years. We used generalized estimating equations with a logit link to evaluate the association of prenatal urinary BPA concentration with the dichotomous outcome wheeze (wheeze over the previous 6 months). Results: Data were available for 365 children; BPA was detected in 99% of maternal urine samples during pregnancy. In multivariable analysis, a one-unit increase in log-transformed creatinine-standardized mean prenatal urinary BPA concentration was not significantly associated with child wheeze from birth to 3 years of age, but there was an interaction of BPA concentration with time (p = 0.003). Mean prenatal BPA above versus below the median was positively associated with wheeze at 6 months of age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 4.1] but not at 3 years (AOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.3, 1.1). In secondary analyses evaluating associations of each prenatal BPA concentration separately, urinary BPA concentrations measured at 16 weeks gestation were associated with wheeze (AOR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5), but BPA concentrations at 26 weeks of gestation or at birth were not. Conclusions: Mean prenatal BPA was associated with increased odds of wheeze in early life, and the effect diminished over time. Evaluating exposure at each prenatal time point demonstrated an association between wheeze from 6 months to 3 years and log-transformed BPA concentration at 16 weeks gestation only.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862017236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862017236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1289/ehp.1104175

DO - 10.1289/ehp.1104175

M3 - Article

VL - 120

SP - 916

EP - 920

JO - Environmental Health Perspectives

JF - Environmental Health Perspectives

SN - 0091-6765

IS - 6

ER -