Preoperative Opioid Use Is Associated With Persistent Use, Readmission and Postoperative Complications After Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

Ryan Ridenour, Christopher Kowalski, Aditya Yadavalli, Djibril Ba, Guodong Liu, Douglas Leslie, Jesse Bible, Michael Aynardi, Matthew Garner, Aman Dhawan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with prolonged opioid use after arthroscopic knee surgery and to identify associations between preoperative usage and postoperative complications. Methods: The MarketScan commercial database was searched to identify patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery from 2005 to 2014 (based on Current Procedure Terminology code). Preoperative comorbidities including Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders mental health disorders, chronic pain, chronic regional pain syndrome, obesity, tobacco use, non-narcotic medications and diabetes were queried and documented. Patients who filled opioid prescriptions 1 to 3 months before surgery were identified. Patients who filled opioid prescriptions after surgery were identified. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine factors associated with prolonged postoperative opioid use. Results: In total, 1,012,486 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery were identified, and we determined which of these patients were on preoperative opioids. Preoperative opioid usage was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of usage out to 1 year. There was a statistically significant association between postoperative usage and preoperative variables (mental health diagnosis, smokers, chronic pain, chronic regional pain syndrome, and use of non-narcotic medications). There was a statistically significant association between preoperative opioid use and 90-day readmission and postoperative complications. Conclusion: In this study, we found that patients taking opioids 1 to 3 months before arthroscopic knee surgery have increased risk of postoperative use. Additionally, chronic opioid use, chronic pain, or use of non-narcotic medications has the highest risk of postoperative opioid use. Finally, preoperative use was associated with an increased risk of 90-day readmission. Evidence: Prognostic Level IV Evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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