Pressure solution models for quartz materials

Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs

J. Taron, Derek Elsworth, O. Kolditz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Pressure solution creep is an important contributor to permeability and porosity change in the upper crust. Engineering projects such as enhanced geothermal systems and petroleum extraction are impacted in the short- and long-term by changes in porous and fracture permeability, and are expectedly influenced by similar creep processes. Of currently available models for pressure solution, few are extendable for variable conditions of stress and temperature, and none have successfully constrained final (equilibrium) compaction magnitudes. With past models and experiments primarily focused on granular media, behavior in fractures remains largely untested at pore or reservoir scale. In this work, a micromechanical model is developed for pressure solution creep that maintains complete dependence on aqueous concentrations and is transferable for arbitrary conditions of stress and temperature. Equilibrium compaction is constrained with a form of "critical stress"; dependent on conditions of pore structure and applied effective stress. Compared to laboratory experiments on granular quartz, predictions are accurate across a range of conditions (400-500° C, 20-150 MPa, and mean particle diameter of 3-120ìm). The model is applied to rough fractures to illustrate important feedbacks between elastic deformation and chemical-mechanical creep. Probing analyses of environments typical of enhanced geothermal systems indicate potential importance for pressure solution, particularly following events that disrupt reservoir equilibrium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium
StatePublished - 2010
Event44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium and the 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2010Jun 30 2010

Other

Other44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium and the 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, UT
Period6/27/106/30/10

Fingerprint

pressure solution
creep
Quartz
Creep
quartz
compaction
Compaction
permeability
granular medium
Elastic deformation
Pore structure
effective stress
upper crust
Crude oil
Porosity
temperature
Experiments
porosity
petroleum
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Taron, J., Elsworth, D., & Kolditz, O. (2010). Pressure solution models for quartz materials: Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs. In 44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium
Taron, J. ; Elsworth, Derek ; Kolditz, O. / Pressure solution models for quartz materials : Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs. 44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 2010.
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Taron, J, Elsworth, D & Kolditz, O 2010, Pressure solution models for quartz materials: Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs. in 44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium and the 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, 6/27/10.

Pressure solution models for quartz materials : Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs. / Taron, J.; Elsworth, Derek; Kolditz, O.

44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Taron J, Elsworth D, Kolditz O. Pressure solution models for quartz materials: Micromechanical development and potential impact in fractured reservoirs. In 44th US Rock Mechanics Symposium - 5th US/Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 2010