Prevalence and predictors of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan African countries: A large population-based study

Djibril M. Ba, Paddy Ssentongo, Edeanya Agbese, Kristen H. Kjerulff

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Abstract

Objective: To measure the prevalence of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries and identify factors associated with contraceptive use in these countries. Study design: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data on contraceptive use from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo, and Uganda). We restricted our sample to women aged 15–49 years and used generalized estimating equations to identify factors associated with contraceptive use while controlling for other covariates. Results: The overall prevalence of current contraceptive use among women of reproductive age was only 17%, with rates ranging from 7% in Gambia to 29% in Uganda. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that women were more likely to use a method of contraception if they were sexually active (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 2.17 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.11, 2.24]); had 5–7 living children (aPR 2.19 [95% CI 1.89, 2.55] compared to no children); had secondary or higher education (aPR 1.71 [95% CI 1.63, 1.78] compared to no education); and were wealthy (aPR 1.34 [95% CI 1.29, 1.40] compared to poor). Conclusion: The use of contraceptives is low in sub-Saharan Africa, but varies substantially across countries. Use of contraception is associated with both personal and socioeconomic factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-32
Number of pages7
JournalSexual and Reproductive Healthcare
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019

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Contraceptive Agents
Africa South of the Sahara
Confidence Intervals
Gambia
Population
Uganda
Contraception
Burundi
Liberia
Angola
Togo
Guinea
Congo
Mali
Burkina Faso
Benin
Cote d'Ivoire
Education
Niger
Senegal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence and predictors of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan African countries: A large population-based study",
abstract = "Objective: To measure the prevalence of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries and identify factors associated with contraceptive use in these countries. Study design: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data on contraceptive use from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo, and Uganda). We restricted our sample to women aged 15–49 years and used generalized estimating equations to identify factors associated with contraceptive use while controlling for other covariates. Results: The overall prevalence of current contraceptive use among women of reproductive age was only 17{\%}, with rates ranging from 7{\%} in Gambia to 29{\%} in Uganda. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that women were more likely to use a method of contraception if they were sexually active (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 2.17 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 2.11, 2.24]); had 5–7 living children (aPR 2.19 [95{\%} CI 1.89, 2.55] compared to no children); had secondary or higher education (aPR 1.71 [95{\%} CI 1.63, 1.78] compared to no education); and were wealthy (aPR 1.34 [95{\%} CI 1.29, 1.40] compared to poor). Conclusion: The use of contraceptives is low in sub-Saharan Africa, but varies substantially across countries. Use of contraception is associated with both personal and socioeconomic factors.",
author = "Ba, {Djibril M.} and Paddy Ssentongo and Edeanya Agbese and Kjerulff, {Kristen H.}",
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T2 - A large population-based study

AU - Ba, Djibril M.

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AU - Agbese, Edeanya

AU - Kjerulff, Kristen H.

PY - 2019/10

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N2 - Objective: To measure the prevalence of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries and identify factors associated with contraceptive use in these countries. Study design: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data on contraceptive use from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo, and Uganda). We restricted our sample to women aged 15–49 years and used generalized estimating equations to identify factors associated with contraceptive use while controlling for other covariates. Results: The overall prevalence of current contraceptive use among women of reproductive age was only 17%, with rates ranging from 7% in Gambia to 29% in Uganda. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that women were more likely to use a method of contraception if they were sexually active (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 2.17 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.11, 2.24]); had 5–7 living children (aPR 2.19 [95% CI 1.89, 2.55] compared to no children); had secondary or higher education (aPR 1.71 [95% CI 1.63, 1.78] compared to no education); and were wealthy (aPR 1.34 [95% CI 1.29, 1.40] compared to poor). Conclusion: The use of contraceptives is low in sub-Saharan Africa, but varies substantially across countries. Use of contraception is associated with both personal and socioeconomic factors.

AB - Objective: To measure the prevalence of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries and identify factors associated with contraceptive use in these countries. Study design: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data on contraceptive use from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for 17 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo, and Uganda). We restricted our sample to women aged 15–49 years and used generalized estimating equations to identify factors associated with contraceptive use while controlling for other covariates. Results: The overall prevalence of current contraceptive use among women of reproductive age was only 17%, with rates ranging from 7% in Gambia to 29% in Uganda. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that women were more likely to use a method of contraception if they were sexually active (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 2.17 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.11, 2.24]); had 5–7 living children (aPR 2.19 [95% CI 1.89, 2.55] compared to no children); had secondary or higher education (aPR 1.71 [95% CI 1.63, 1.78] compared to no education); and were wealthy (aPR 1.34 [95% CI 1.29, 1.40] compared to poor). Conclusion: The use of contraceptives is low in sub-Saharan Africa, but varies substantially across countries. Use of contraception is associated with both personal and socioeconomic factors.

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