Preventing alcohol-related harm in college students: Alcohol-related Harm Prevention program effects on hypothesized mediating variables

J. W. Graham, J. W. Tatterson, M. M. Roberts, S. E. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Alcohol-related Harm Prevention (AHP) program is a normative education and skill-acquisition program designed to reduce serious, long-term alcohol-related harm in college students. Without admonishing students not to drink, which is likely to fail in many student populations, the AHP program attempts to give students the necessary perceptions, motivation and skills to intervene within their peer group, and to make proactive harm-avoidance plans with friends prior to social occasions that involve using alcohol. The AHP program is a two-session, in-class intervention that corrects misperceived norms regarding levels of alcohol use, caring about friends, acceptability of risky behaviors and willingness to intervene. The program also makes use of interactive discussions with students and a graded, peer interview assignment to identify and promote harm-prevention strategies. The AHP program was implemented during fall 1999 at a large northeastern university. The program was received very well by students and showed significant effects on the proximal outcomes hypothesized to mediate more distal health-relevant outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-84
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

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