Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast: The Mayo Clinic experience

Jeffrey S. Scow, Carol A. Reynolds, Amy C. Degnim, Ivy A. Petersen, James W. Jakub, Judy C. Boughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Angiosarcoma of the breast can be divided into primary and secondary. The objective was to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with breast angiosarcoma and to compare primary versus secondary angiosarcoma. Methods: Breast angiosarcoma cases at Mayo Clinic from 1960 to 2008 were identified. Clinicopathologic factors were reviewed. Characteristics of primary and secondary angiosarcoma were compared. Results: Twenty-seven cases of primary angiosarcoma and 14 cases of secondary angiosarcoma were identified. The median age of primary angiosarcoma patients was lower than that of secondary angiosarcoma - 43 years versus 73 years (P<0.0001). Primary angiosarcoma more frequently presented with a mass, whereas secondary angiosarcoma presented with a rash (P<0.0001). Median time from radiation to secondary angiosarcoma diagnosis was 6.8 years. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm for primary angiosarcoma and 5.0 cm for secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.7). Tumors were high grade in 33% of primary angiosarcoma and 82% of secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.02). Five-year survival for primary and secondary angiosarcoma was 46% and 69%, respectively (P=0.8). Conclusion: Primary angiosarcoma occurs in younger patients than secondary and more frequently presents with a mass. Mastectomy is the mainstay of treatment for breast angiosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with poor long-term prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-407
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

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Hemangiosarcoma
Angiosarcoma of the breast
Neoplasms
Mastectomy
Exanthema

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Scow, J. S., Reynolds, C. A., Degnim, A. C., Petersen, I. A., Jakub, J. W., & Boughey, J. C. (2010). Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast: The Mayo Clinic experience. Journal of Surgical Oncology, 101(5), 401-407. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.21497
Scow, Jeffrey S. ; Reynolds, Carol A. ; Degnim, Amy C. ; Petersen, Ivy A. ; Jakub, James W. ; Boughey, Judy C. / Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast : The Mayo Clinic experience. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 101, No. 5. pp. 401-407.
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abstract = "Background and Objectives: Angiosarcoma of the breast can be divided into primary and secondary. The objective was to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with breast angiosarcoma and to compare primary versus secondary angiosarcoma. Methods: Breast angiosarcoma cases at Mayo Clinic from 1960 to 2008 were identified. Clinicopathologic factors were reviewed. Characteristics of primary and secondary angiosarcoma were compared. Results: Twenty-seven cases of primary angiosarcoma and 14 cases of secondary angiosarcoma were identified. The median age of primary angiosarcoma patients was lower than that of secondary angiosarcoma - 43 years versus 73 years (P<0.0001). Primary angiosarcoma more frequently presented with a mass, whereas secondary angiosarcoma presented with a rash (P<0.0001). Median time from radiation to secondary angiosarcoma diagnosis was 6.8 years. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm for primary angiosarcoma and 5.0 cm for secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.7). Tumors were high grade in 33{\%} of primary angiosarcoma and 82{\%} of secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.02). Five-year survival for primary and secondary angiosarcoma was 46{\%} and 69{\%}, respectively (P=0.8). Conclusion: Primary angiosarcoma occurs in younger patients than secondary and more frequently presents with a mass. Mastectomy is the mainstay of treatment for breast angiosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with poor long-term prognosis.",
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Scow, JS, Reynolds, CA, Degnim, AC, Petersen, IA, Jakub, JW & Boughey, JC 2010, 'Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast: The Mayo Clinic experience', Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 101, no. 5, pp. 401-407. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.21497

Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast : The Mayo Clinic experience. / Scow, Jeffrey S.; Reynolds, Carol A.; Degnim, Amy C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Jakub, James W.; Boughey, Judy C.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 101, No. 5, 01.04.2010, p. 401-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast

T2 - The Mayo Clinic experience

AU - Scow, Jeffrey S.

AU - Reynolds, Carol A.

AU - Degnim, Amy C.

AU - Petersen, Ivy A.

AU - Jakub, James W.

AU - Boughey, Judy C.

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N2 - Background and Objectives: Angiosarcoma of the breast can be divided into primary and secondary. The objective was to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with breast angiosarcoma and to compare primary versus secondary angiosarcoma. Methods: Breast angiosarcoma cases at Mayo Clinic from 1960 to 2008 were identified. Clinicopathologic factors were reviewed. Characteristics of primary and secondary angiosarcoma were compared. Results: Twenty-seven cases of primary angiosarcoma and 14 cases of secondary angiosarcoma were identified. The median age of primary angiosarcoma patients was lower than that of secondary angiosarcoma - 43 years versus 73 years (P<0.0001). Primary angiosarcoma more frequently presented with a mass, whereas secondary angiosarcoma presented with a rash (P<0.0001). Median time from radiation to secondary angiosarcoma diagnosis was 6.8 years. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm for primary angiosarcoma and 5.0 cm for secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.7). Tumors were high grade in 33% of primary angiosarcoma and 82% of secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.02). Five-year survival for primary and secondary angiosarcoma was 46% and 69%, respectively (P=0.8). Conclusion: Primary angiosarcoma occurs in younger patients than secondary and more frequently presents with a mass. Mastectomy is the mainstay of treatment for breast angiosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with poor long-term prognosis.

AB - Background and Objectives: Angiosarcoma of the breast can be divided into primary and secondary. The objective was to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with breast angiosarcoma and to compare primary versus secondary angiosarcoma. Methods: Breast angiosarcoma cases at Mayo Clinic from 1960 to 2008 were identified. Clinicopathologic factors were reviewed. Characteristics of primary and secondary angiosarcoma were compared. Results: Twenty-seven cases of primary angiosarcoma and 14 cases of secondary angiosarcoma were identified. The median age of primary angiosarcoma patients was lower than that of secondary angiosarcoma - 43 years versus 73 years (P<0.0001). Primary angiosarcoma more frequently presented with a mass, whereas secondary angiosarcoma presented with a rash (P<0.0001). Median time from radiation to secondary angiosarcoma diagnosis was 6.8 years. Median tumor size was 7.0 cm for primary angiosarcoma and 5.0 cm for secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.7). Tumors were high grade in 33% of primary angiosarcoma and 82% of secondary angiosarcoma (P=0.02). Five-year survival for primary and secondary angiosarcoma was 46% and 69%, respectively (P=0.8). Conclusion: Primary angiosarcoma occurs in younger patients than secondary and more frequently presents with a mass. Mastectomy is the mainstay of treatment for breast angiosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with poor long-term prognosis.

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