Primary cutaneous polymorphic ebv-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after a renal transplant and review of the literature

Nkanyezi N. Ferguson, Christie P. Thomas, Raymond Hohl, Sergei I. Syrbu, Mary S. Stone, Karolyn A. Wanat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Importance: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an uncommon complication after solid organ transplants and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Extranodal involvement in PTLD can involve several organ systems, including the central nervous system, bone marrow, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and skin. Isolated involvement of the skin without systemic involvement in PTLD is rare. Primary cutaneous PTLD is generally categorized as either cutaneous T-cell lymphomas or cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, with variable Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity. Herein, we describe an exceedingly uncommon case of a polymorphic variant of primary cutaneous PTLD. Observations: A woman in her 30s, who received an EBV+ deceased donor kidney transplant, presented with a 2-week history of 2 indurated patches over the lower abdomen. A skin biopsy revealed an atypical lymphoid proliferation with immunohistochemical stains demonstrating a mixed population of both B and T cells that stained strongly positive for EBV-encoded RNA. A bone marrow biopsy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography were negative for systemic involvement. The patient was treated with immunosuppression reduction and rituximab infusions. Conclusions and Relevance: This case highlights a rare polymorphic variant of primary cutaneous EBV-associated PTLD and increases awareness of this uncommon posttransplant complication. Cutaneous PTLD is reviewed, therefore dermatologists are aware of this uncommon disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)790-794
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Dermatopathology
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Transplants
Kidney
Skin
Human Herpesvirus 4
Bone Marrow
Biopsy
Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
B-Cell Lymphoma
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Abdomen
Immunosuppression
Gastrointestinal Tract
B-Lymphocytes
Coloring Agents
Central Nervous System
Tissue Donors
RNA
T-Lymphocytes
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Ferguson, Nkanyezi N. ; Thomas, Christie P. ; Hohl, Raymond ; Syrbu, Sergei I. ; Stone, Mary S. ; Wanat, Karolyn A. / Primary cutaneous polymorphic ebv-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after a renal transplant and review of the literature. In: American Journal of Dermatopathology. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 10. pp. 790-794.
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Primary cutaneous polymorphic ebv-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after a renal transplant and review of the literature. / Ferguson, Nkanyezi N.; Thomas, Christie P.; Hohl, Raymond; Syrbu, Sergei I.; Stone, Mary S.; Wanat, Karolyn A.

In: American Journal of Dermatopathology, Vol. 37, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 790-794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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