Print and Manuscript Culture

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The essence of this article is print and manuscript culture in the Americas and their influence on American literature. A furor was created over the publication of James Franklin's newspaper, the New-England Courant. A group of staunch religious believers averred that the tendency of this paper was to mock religion, and bring it into contempt. They wanted to not only silence James Franklin and his press but take away his livelihood, which was the goal of the committee, the Massachusetts Council. The history of scribal and printed publication in colonial America reveals the contest of voices and the varying versions of "truth" that resulted from a collision of competing interests. This article further explains the ideas of script, print, and the performance of culture. An analysis of scribal publication winds up the article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199940301
ISBN (Print)9780195187274
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

Fingerprint

Manuscript Culture
Print Culture
Religion
Contempt
History
Contests
Believer
Livelihoods
Colonial America
New England
American Literature
Essence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Conklin, C. M. (2012). Print and Manuscript Culture. In The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187274.013.0015
Conklin, Carla Mulford. / Print and Manuscript Culture. The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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Conklin, CM 2012, Print and Manuscript Culture. in The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187274.013.0015

Print and Manuscript Culture. / Conklin, Carla Mulford.

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Conklin CM. Print and Manuscript Culture. In The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187274.013.0015