Prior Exposure to Interpersonal Violence and Long-Term Treatment Response for Boys With a Disruptive Behavior Disorder

Chad E. Shenk, Lorah D. Dorn, David J. Kolko, Joseph R. Rausch, Salvatore P. Insana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interpersonal violence (IPV) is common in children with a disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) and increases the risk for greater DBD symptom severity, callous-unemotional (CU) traits, and neuroendocrine disruption. Thus, IPV may make it difficult to change symptom trajectories for families receiving DBD interventions given these relationships. The current study examined whether IPV prior to receiving treatment for a DBD predicted trajectories of a variety of associated outcomes, specifically DBD symptoms, CU traits, and cortisol concentrations. Boys with a DBD diagnosis (N=66; age range=6-11 years; 54.5% of whom experienced IPV prior to treatment) of either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder participated in a randomized clinical trial and were assessed 3 years following treatment. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that prior IPV predicted smaller rates of change in DBD symptoms, CU traits, and cortisol trajectories, indicating less benefit from intervention. The effect size magnitudes of IPV were large for each outcome (d=0.88-1.07). These results suggest that IPV is a predictor of the long-term treatment response for boys with a DBD. Including trauma-focused components into existing DBD interventions may be worth testing to improve treatment effectiveness for boys with a prior history of IPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-592
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of traumatic stress
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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