Privileged to be on camera: Sports broadcasters assess the role of social identity in the profession

Marie Hardin, Jason Genovese, Nan Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on a survey of sports broadcasters in top markets, the authors use the theoretical lens of privilege to examine career paths of white men, women, and racial minorities and their views about social identity as influential in their career success. Those most privileged by gender (male) and race (white) least often acknowledged it. They were also less likely to believe women and minorities faced discrimination. Women and racial minorities were more likely to view their social identity as a reason they were hired, suggesting they might view themselves as quota hires. The authors discuss the practical implications of the findings and provide suggestions for the profession and for further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-93
Number of pages14
JournalElectronic News
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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broadcaster
Sports
Lenses
profession
Cameras
minority
career
privilege
discrimination
gender
market

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems
  • Communication

Cite this

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Privileged to be on camera : Sports broadcasters assess the role of social identity in the profession. / Hardin, Marie; Genovese, Jason; Yu, Nan.

In: Electronic News, Vol. 3, No. 2, 01.04.2009, p. 80-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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