Probability of death, disability, and restricted work activity in United States underground bituminous coal mines, 1975-1981

James D. Bennett, David Lynn Passmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined relationships between mine and miner characteristics and severity of 82,945 underground bituminous coal mine injuries using logistic regression techniques. Injuries were classified as severe if they resulted in death, disability, or restricted work activity. Supervisory and maintenance personnel were found to have fewer chances of severe injuries than "all other" job classifications. A shaft or slope had a lower association with severe injuries than the face. The probability of a severe injury increased each succeeding year from 1975 through 1981. Mining method was not related to degree of injury. Older miners had the same probability of severe injuries as younger miners. Weeks of experience in mining, on a particular job, and in a specific mine were not related to severity of injuries. Mobile equipment operators had the same chance of severe injuries as miners in "all other" job classifications. Accidents at intersections and "other" locations were as likely to produce severe injuries as those at the face. Elapsed shift time prior to an injury was not related to injury severity. The implications of these findings are discussed and recommendations made for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Safety Research
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

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