Professors on the run: How Marcos's narratives of Zapatismo refashion North American Cold War anxiety

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines the communiqués issued by Subcomandante Marcos during the early years of the Zapatista rebellion in Mexico (1992-1998). It addresses a double voice, and a double mission, of these internet pronouncements: first, as a tool for a local Indigenous uprising in the state of Chiapas; second, as a part of a much broader anti-neoliberal and antineo-imperialist struggle. The article argues that the unusual interlacing of a local, almost intimate struggle with a much broader ideological struggle has its sources, models and origins, paradoxically, in U.S. Cold War anticommunist discourse of the 1950s. Both discourses featured almost priestly, technocratic, master-explainers of an unseen enemy; both resorted to normative narratives of domesticity and infantilization; both relied on masked anti-heroes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-73
Number of pages22
JournalComparative American Studies
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

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cold war
university teacher
anxiety
narrative
discourse
Mexico
Internet
Discourse
Cold War
Anxiety
1950s
Chiapas
Imperialist
Uprising
Antihero
Zapatista
Domesticity
World Wide Web
Enemy
Rebellion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

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Professors on the run : How Marcos's narratives of Zapatismo refashion North American Cold War anxiety. / Ochoa, John Andres.

In: Comparative American Studies, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.03.2013, p. 52-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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