Profet, profits, and proof

Do nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy protect women from harmful vegetables?

Judith E. Brown, Emily S. Kahn, Terryl Johnson Hartman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research was to test a widely publicized theory that nausea and vomiting of pregnancy protects women from ingesting certain vegetables and other foods that produce congenital anomalies and other adverse outcomes of pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: The theory was tested with use of data on dietary intake, illnesses, and pregnancy outcome obtained from 549 women participating in a prospective, population-based study. RESULTS: No relationship between intake of proscribed vegetables and other foods and the presence of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy was identified. Intake of proscribed foods was unrelated to adverse outcomes of pregnancy. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that claims made in the popular press about food and health relationships should be evaluated by the media as fiction unless supported by scientific research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-181
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume176
Issue number1 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Pregnancy Outcome
Vegetables
Nausea
Vomiting
Food
Pregnancy
Research
Eating
Health
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Brown, Judith E. ; Kahn, Emily S. ; Hartman, Terryl Johnson. / Profet, profits, and proof : Do nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy protect women from harmful vegetables?. In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology. 1997 ; Vol. 176, No. 1 I. pp. 179-181.
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Profet, profits, and proof : Do nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy protect women from harmful vegetables? / Brown, Judith E.; Kahn, Emily S.; Hartman, Terryl Johnson.

In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 176, No. 1 I, 01.01.1997, p. 179-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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