Prognosis and treatment of non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma: A comparative study

Ming Yin, Wenge Wang, Joseph Drabick, Harold Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with limited publications confined to small retrospective case reviews and case reports. Knowledge of this disease is limited because information from previous studies is insufficient and inconsistent. Methods: We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma, and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age was 50-54years in primary breast angiosarcoma and 70-74years in secondary breast angiosarcoma, while median OS was 93 and 32months, respectively. Age, tumor grade and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. Compared with primary breast angiosarcoma, patients with secondary breast angiosarcoma had a "nominal" increased death risk (HR=1.89, 95% CI, 1.43-2.50, p<0.001), which was driven by older age and more aggressive tumor phenotype at presentation. Mastectomy was associated with worse OS compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjHR=2.47, 95% CI, 1.29-4.74) in primary angiosarcoma patients. Adjuvant radiation was associated with worse OS in secondary angiosarcoma patients (adjHR =1.77, 95% CI, 1.01-3.12). Conclusions: There is a "nominal" increased death risk in secondary breast angiosarcoma due to advanced clinicopathological features. Both BCS and mastectomy are feasible in primary and secondary angiosarcoma if R0 can be achieved. Routine radiation in unselected breast angiosarcoma should be cautious because there is no survival benefit in primary AS and appeared to be associated with a worse OS in secondary AS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number295
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 2017

Fingerprint

Survival
Hemangiosarcoma
Mastectomy
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Breast
SEER Program
Radiation
Angiosarcoma of the breast
Publications
Phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Prognosis and treatment of non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma: A comparative study",
abstract = "Background: Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with limited publications confined to small retrospective case reviews and case reports. Knowledge of this disease is limited because information from previous studies is insufficient and inconsistent. Methods: We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma, and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age was 50-54years in primary breast angiosarcoma and 70-74years in secondary breast angiosarcoma, while median OS was 93 and 32months, respectively. Age, tumor grade and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. Compared with primary breast angiosarcoma, patients with secondary breast angiosarcoma had a {"}nominal{"} increased death risk (HR=1.89, 95{\%} CI, 1.43-2.50, p<0.001), which was driven by older age and more aggressive tumor phenotype at presentation. Mastectomy was associated with worse OS compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjHR=2.47, 95{\%} CI, 1.29-4.74) in primary angiosarcoma patients. Adjuvant radiation was associated with worse OS in secondary angiosarcoma patients (adjHR =1.77, 95{\%} CI, 1.01-3.12). Conclusions: There is a {"}nominal{"} increased death risk in secondary breast angiosarcoma due to advanced clinicopathological features. Both BCS and mastectomy are feasible in primary and secondary angiosarcoma if R0 can be achieved. Routine radiation in unselected breast angiosarcoma should be cautious because there is no survival benefit in primary AS and appeared to be associated with a worse OS in secondary AS.",
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Prognosis and treatment of non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma : A comparative study. / Yin, Ming; Wang, Wenge; Drabick, Joseph; Harvey, Harold.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 17, No. 1, 295, 27.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prognosis and treatment of non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma

T2 - A comparative study

AU - Yin, Ming

AU - Wang, Wenge

AU - Drabick, Joseph

AU - Harvey, Harold

PY - 2017/4/27

Y1 - 2017/4/27

N2 - Background: Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with limited publications confined to small retrospective case reviews and case reports. Knowledge of this disease is limited because information from previous studies is insufficient and inconsistent. Methods: We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma, and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age was 50-54years in primary breast angiosarcoma and 70-74years in secondary breast angiosarcoma, while median OS was 93 and 32months, respectively. Age, tumor grade and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. Compared with primary breast angiosarcoma, patients with secondary breast angiosarcoma had a "nominal" increased death risk (HR=1.89, 95% CI, 1.43-2.50, p<0.001), which was driven by older age and more aggressive tumor phenotype at presentation. Mastectomy was associated with worse OS compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjHR=2.47, 95% CI, 1.29-4.74) in primary angiosarcoma patients. Adjuvant radiation was associated with worse OS in secondary angiosarcoma patients (adjHR =1.77, 95% CI, 1.01-3.12). Conclusions: There is a "nominal" increased death risk in secondary breast angiosarcoma due to advanced clinicopathological features. Both BCS and mastectomy are feasible in primary and secondary angiosarcoma if R0 can be achieved. Routine radiation in unselected breast angiosarcoma should be cautious because there is no survival benefit in primary AS and appeared to be associated with a worse OS in secondary AS.

AB - Background: Breast angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy with limited publications confined to small retrospective case reviews and case reports. Knowledge of this disease is limited because information from previous studies is insufficient and inconsistent. Methods: We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program for non-metastatic primary and secondary breast angiosarcoma, and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age was 50-54years in primary breast angiosarcoma and 70-74years in secondary breast angiosarcoma, while median OS was 93 and 32months, respectively. Age, tumor grade and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. Compared with primary breast angiosarcoma, patients with secondary breast angiosarcoma had a "nominal" increased death risk (HR=1.89, 95% CI, 1.43-2.50, p<0.001), which was driven by older age and more aggressive tumor phenotype at presentation. Mastectomy was associated with worse OS compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjHR=2.47, 95% CI, 1.29-4.74) in primary angiosarcoma patients. Adjuvant radiation was associated with worse OS in secondary angiosarcoma patients (adjHR =1.77, 95% CI, 1.01-3.12). Conclusions: There is a "nominal" increased death risk in secondary breast angiosarcoma due to advanced clinicopathological features. Both BCS and mastectomy are feasible in primary and secondary angiosarcoma if R0 can be achieved. Routine radiation in unselected breast angiosarcoma should be cautious because there is no survival benefit in primary AS and appeared to be associated with a worse OS in secondary AS.

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U2 - 10.1186/s12885-017-3292-7

DO - 10.1186/s12885-017-3292-7

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