Project-based pedagogy to enhance teaching and learning in energy and the environment for honors students

Yaw Yeboah, Sarma V. Pisupati

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper presents a project-based teaching pedagogy for an honors level freshman course on energy and the environment. In addition to class lectures and discussions, students select from among a menu of energy-related topics for their project. The projects cover various aspects of the in-class discussions on energy fundamentals, renewable energy, fossil fuels, environmental impact, and energy policy. Each student prepares a 30 minute presentation on their topic to be given in class. The key criteria are for the lecture and data presented to be substantially different from the in-class lectures, up-to-date, and extend beyond the US (i.e., internationalized or globalized). Students are expected to be the experts on the topic after completing and presenting their project. Sample student topics include: wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, solar, biomass, ocean and tidal energy, coal, petroleum, natural gas, oil shale and tar sands, electric power, fuel cells, environmental impact of energy, energy supply and demand, materials for energy applications, and the 2005 US Energy Act. The class, over a two year period 2005-2006, has shown a remarkable level of growth, excitement and interest of students. The presentations followed by questions and answers have shown enhanced teaching and learning of students. Student evaluations have indicated the project to be one of the key aspects of the course students liked most. It was concluded that project-based pedagogy significantly enhances teaching and learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Teaching
Students
Environmental impact
Oil shale
Energy policy
Tar
Gas oils
Fossil fuels
Fuel cells
Natural gas
Biomass
Sand
Crude oil
Coal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The paper presents a project-based teaching pedagogy for an honors level freshman course on energy and the environment. In addition to class lectures and discussions, students select from among a menu of energy-related topics for their project. The projects cover various aspects of the in-class discussions on energy fundamentals, renewable energy, fossil fuels, environmental impact, and energy policy. Each student prepares a 30 minute presentation on their topic to be given in class. The key criteria are for the lecture and data presented to be substantially different from the in-class lectures, up-to-date, and extend beyond the US (i.e., internationalized or globalized). Students are expected to be the experts on the topic after completing and presenting their project. Sample student topics include: wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, solar, biomass, ocean and tidal energy, coal, petroleum, natural gas, oil shale and tar sands, electric power, fuel cells, environmental impact of energy, energy supply and demand, materials for energy applications, and the 2005 US Energy Act. The class, over a two year period 2005-2006, has shown a remarkable level of growth, excitement and interest of students. The presentations followed by questions and answers have shown enhanced teaching and learning of students. Student evaluations have indicated the project to be one of the key aspects of the course students liked most. It was concluded that project-based pedagogy significantly enhances teaching and learning.",
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