Project management and burnout: Implications of the Demand-Control-Support model on project-based work

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29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Project-based work has long been characterized as frenetic, fast-paced, and dynamic. The often competing constraints imposed by schedules, stakeholders, and budgetary restrictions make project activities conflict-laden and highly conducive to work-related stress. Stress is not an end unto itself but instead, is often a precursor for burnout. Burnout is a psychological syndrome of emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a study of burnout among project management personnel. Using the Demand-Control-Support model as our conceptual framework, we analyzed a sample of respondents from four project-intensive organizations. Our findings demonstrated that women tend to experience emotional exhaustion to a greater extent than their male counterparts. Further, control and social support do serve as moderators for the burnout dimensions of emotional exhaustion and cynicism, suggesting limited support for the Demand-Control-Support model. Implications of this study for project management and workplace burnout are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-589
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Project Management
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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