Project Personnel, Job Demands, and Workplace Burnout

The Differential Effects of Job Title and Project Type

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As a result of the frenetic and demanding working conditions associated with projects, much research and theory has addressed the stress and burn-out propensity of members of project teams. However, research has generally not taken into consideration the differential effects of job title or types of project organizations on job demands, perhaps assuming that all levels within a project team and all project types offer similar levels of job demands. This study addresses the question of how the perception of job demands varies by job title (project manager, engineer, and project team member) and across project type (construction, research and development, and information technology). Using a sample of 208 project personnel, we examined the dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal efficacy) for the evidence of their differential impact across both job title and project type. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in perceived job demands across both job title and project type. However, we found that project managers have a significantly higher level of the emotional exhaustion form of burnout than other job classifications and construction project personnel suffer from a significantly higher level of emotional exhaustion than those working on other classes of project.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7373602
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Transactions on Engineering Management
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Personnel
Managers
Information technology
Engineers
Burnout
Work place
Project type
Job demands
Emotional exhaustion
Project teams
Project manager

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Strategy and Management
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

@article{ab86d1446c5241a585ee7302bea29666,
title = "Project Personnel, Job Demands, and Workplace Burnout: The Differential Effects of Job Title and Project Type",
abstract = "As a result of the frenetic and demanding working conditions associated with projects, much research and theory has addressed the stress and burn-out propensity of members of project teams. However, research has generally not taken into consideration the differential effects of job title or types of project organizations on job demands, perhaps assuming that all levels within a project team and all project types offer similar levels of job demands. This study addresses the question of how the perception of job demands varies by job title (project manager, engineer, and project team member) and across project type (construction, research and development, and information technology). Using a sample of 208 project personnel, we examined the dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal efficacy) for the evidence of their differential impact across both job title and project type. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in perceived job demands across both job title and project type. However, we found that project managers have a significantly higher level of the emotional exhaustion form of burnout than other job classifications and construction project personnel suffer from a significantly higher level of emotional exhaustion than those working on other classes of project.",
author = "Jeffrey Pinto and Peerasit Patanakul and Pinto, {Mary Beth}",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/TEM.2015.2509163",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "91--100",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management",
issn = "0018-9391",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Project Personnel, Job Demands, and Workplace Burnout

T2 - The Differential Effects of Job Title and Project Type

AU - Pinto, Jeffrey

AU - Patanakul, Peerasit

AU - Pinto, Mary Beth

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - As a result of the frenetic and demanding working conditions associated with projects, much research and theory has addressed the stress and burn-out propensity of members of project teams. However, research has generally not taken into consideration the differential effects of job title or types of project organizations on job demands, perhaps assuming that all levels within a project team and all project types offer similar levels of job demands. This study addresses the question of how the perception of job demands varies by job title (project manager, engineer, and project team member) and across project type (construction, research and development, and information technology). Using a sample of 208 project personnel, we examined the dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal efficacy) for the evidence of their differential impact across both job title and project type. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in perceived job demands across both job title and project type. However, we found that project managers have a significantly higher level of the emotional exhaustion form of burnout than other job classifications and construction project personnel suffer from a significantly higher level of emotional exhaustion than those working on other classes of project.

AB - As a result of the frenetic and demanding working conditions associated with projects, much research and theory has addressed the stress and burn-out propensity of members of project teams. However, research has generally not taken into consideration the differential effects of job title or types of project organizations on job demands, perhaps assuming that all levels within a project team and all project types offer similar levels of job demands. This study addresses the question of how the perception of job demands varies by job title (project manager, engineer, and project team member) and across project type (construction, research and development, and information technology). Using a sample of 208 project personnel, we examined the dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal efficacy) for the evidence of their differential impact across both job title and project type. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in perceived job demands across both job title and project type. However, we found that project managers have a significantly higher level of the emotional exhaustion form of burnout than other job classifications and construction project personnel suffer from a significantly higher level of emotional exhaustion than those working on other classes of project.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84953248328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84953248328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/TEM.2015.2509163

DO - 10.1109/TEM.2015.2509163

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 91

EP - 100

JO - IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

JF - IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

SN - 0018-9391

IS - 1

M1 - 7373602

ER -