Promoting healthy eating and active playtime by connecting to nature families with preschool children: Evaluation of pilot study "play&Grow"

Tanja Sobko, Zhenzhen Jia, Matthew Kaplan, Alfred Lee, Chia Huei Tseng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:This pilot project aimed to evaluate the "Play&Grow" program which promotes age-appropriate dietary habits and playtime healthy routines through "connectedness to nature" experiences in Hong Kong families with young children.Method:Thirty-eight preschoolers (aged 33.97 ± 9.38 mo), mothers, and their domestic workers were recruited. The families attended one workshop/week for a 4-mo period, consisting of: (i) health topic; (ii) food games; (iii) nature-related outdoor activities.Results:Feeding practices, particularly Promoting and Encouragement to eat (PE) and Instrumental Feeding (IF) improved after the intervention (P = 0.008 and P = 0.016, respectively). Mother's BMI, responsibility for child's meal, child's birth weight had a bearing on the improvement of PE, r 2 = 0.243, F(3,33) = 3.54, P = 0.025. Domestic helper's responsibility for child's cooking and her IF practices could predict child's picky eating (r 2 = 0.203, F(2,34) = 4.322, P = 0.021). Mother's responsibility for child and helper's responsibility for cooking could predict child's consumption of salty foods (r 2 = 0.252, F(2,34) = 5.737, P = 0.007). Physical activity of caregivers improved after the intervention.Conclusion:The pilot confirmed the design, protocols, evaluation instruments, and logistics of the study. Modified "Play&Grow" intervention will be conducted in a more rigorous randomized controlled trial to determine the long-term impact on obesity prevention in Hong Kong.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-581
Number of pages10
JournalPediatric Research
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Preschool Children
Mothers
Cooking
Hong Kong
Food
Feeding Behavior
Healthy Diet
Birth Weight
Caregivers
Meals
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Eating
Exercise
Education
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background:This pilot project aimed to evaluate the {"}Play&Grow{"} program which promotes age-appropriate dietary habits and playtime healthy routines through {"}connectedness to nature{"} experiences in Hong Kong families with young children.Method:Thirty-eight preschoolers (aged 33.97 ± 9.38 mo), mothers, and their domestic workers were recruited. The families attended one workshop/week for a 4-mo period, consisting of: (i) health topic; (ii) food games; (iii) nature-related outdoor activities.Results:Feeding practices, particularly Promoting and Encouragement to eat (PE) and Instrumental Feeding (IF) improved after the intervention (P = 0.008 and P = 0.016, respectively). Mother's BMI, responsibility for child's meal, child's birth weight had a bearing on the improvement of PE, r 2 = 0.243, F(3,33) = 3.54, P = 0.025. Domestic helper's responsibility for child's cooking and her IF practices could predict child's picky eating (r 2 = 0.203, F(2,34) = 4.322, P = 0.021). Mother's responsibility for child and helper's responsibility for cooking could predict child's consumption of salty foods (r 2 = 0.252, F(2,34) = 5.737, P = 0.007). Physical activity of caregivers improved after the intervention.Conclusion:The pilot confirmed the design, protocols, evaluation instruments, and logistics of the study. Modified {"}Play&Grow{"} intervention will be conducted in a more rigorous randomized controlled trial to determine the long-term impact on obesity prevention in Hong Kong.",
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Promoting healthy eating and active playtime by connecting to nature families with preschool children : Evaluation of pilot study "play&Grow". / Sobko, Tanja; Jia, Zhenzhen; Kaplan, Matthew; Lee, Alfred; Tseng, Chia Huei.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 572-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Promoting healthy eating and active playtime by connecting to nature families with preschool children

T2 - Evaluation of pilot study "play&Grow"

AU - Sobko, Tanja

AU - Jia, Zhenzhen

AU - Kaplan, Matthew

AU - Lee, Alfred

AU - Tseng, Chia Huei

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Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Background:This pilot project aimed to evaluate the "Play&Grow" program which promotes age-appropriate dietary habits and playtime healthy routines through "connectedness to nature" experiences in Hong Kong families with young children.Method:Thirty-eight preschoolers (aged 33.97 ± 9.38 mo), mothers, and their domestic workers were recruited. The families attended one workshop/week for a 4-mo period, consisting of: (i) health topic; (ii) food games; (iii) nature-related outdoor activities.Results:Feeding practices, particularly Promoting and Encouragement to eat (PE) and Instrumental Feeding (IF) improved after the intervention (P = 0.008 and P = 0.016, respectively). Mother's BMI, responsibility for child's meal, child's birth weight had a bearing on the improvement of PE, r 2 = 0.243, F(3,33) = 3.54, P = 0.025. Domestic helper's responsibility for child's cooking and her IF practices could predict child's picky eating (r 2 = 0.203, F(2,34) = 4.322, P = 0.021). Mother's responsibility for child and helper's responsibility for cooking could predict child's consumption of salty foods (r 2 = 0.252, F(2,34) = 5.737, P = 0.007). Physical activity of caregivers improved after the intervention.Conclusion:The pilot confirmed the design, protocols, evaluation instruments, and logistics of the study. Modified "Play&Grow" intervention will be conducted in a more rigorous randomized controlled trial to determine the long-term impact on obesity prevention in Hong Kong.

AB - Background:This pilot project aimed to evaluate the "Play&Grow" program which promotes age-appropriate dietary habits and playtime healthy routines through "connectedness to nature" experiences in Hong Kong families with young children.Method:Thirty-eight preschoolers (aged 33.97 ± 9.38 mo), mothers, and their domestic workers were recruited. The families attended one workshop/week for a 4-mo period, consisting of: (i) health topic; (ii) food games; (iii) nature-related outdoor activities.Results:Feeding practices, particularly Promoting and Encouragement to eat (PE) and Instrumental Feeding (IF) improved after the intervention (P = 0.008 and P = 0.016, respectively). Mother's BMI, responsibility for child's meal, child's birth weight had a bearing on the improvement of PE, r 2 = 0.243, F(3,33) = 3.54, P = 0.025. Domestic helper's responsibility for child's cooking and her IF practices could predict child's picky eating (r 2 = 0.203, F(2,34) = 4.322, P = 0.021). Mother's responsibility for child and helper's responsibility for cooking could predict child's consumption of salty foods (r 2 = 0.252, F(2,34) = 5.737, P = 0.007). Physical activity of caregivers improved after the intervention.Conclusion:The pilot confirmed the design, protocols, evaluation instruments, and logistics of the study. Modified "Play&Grow" intervention will be conducted in a more rigorous randomized controlled trial to determine the long-term impact on obesity prevention in Hong Kong.

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