Prose recall: Effects of aging, verbal ability, and reading behavior

G. E. Rice, B. J.F. Meyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes an exploratory multivariate analysis designed to determine the relative contributions of age, verbal ability, education, reading habits, and recall strategies to the explanation of variation in performance on prose recall tasks among adults. Four hundred twenty-two adults in three age groups - young (18 to 32), middle (40 to 54) and old (62 to 80) - read and recalled in writing two 388-word prose passages and answered questions about their background, reading habits, and recall strategies. Results indicate that a decrease in quantity of recall appears with increasing age, though verbal ability is a better predictor of recall than is age. In addition, a recall strategy factor representing a paragraph-by-paragraph retrieval strategy produces the highest simple correlations with total recall and contributes significantly to the other recall measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-480
Number of pages12
JournalJournals of Gerontology
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Aptitude
Habits
Reading
Multivariate Analysis
Age Groups
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging

Cite this

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Prose recall : Effects of aging, verbal ability, and reading behavior. / Rice, G. E.; Meyer, B. J.F.

In: Journals of Gerontology, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.01.1986, p. 469-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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