Prospective and dyadic associations between expectant parents’ prenatal hormone changes and postpartum parenting outcomes

Robin S. Edelstein, William J. Chopik, Darby E. Saxbe, Britney Wardecker, Amy C. Moors, Onawa P. LaBelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the transition to parenthood, both men and women experience hormone changes that are thought to promote parental care. Yet very few studies have explicitly tested the hypothesis that prenatal hormone changes are associated with postpartum parenting behavior. In a longitudinal study of 27 first-time expectant couples, we assessed whether prenatal hormone changes were moderated by self- and partner-reported parenting outcomes at 3 months postpartum. Expectant fathers showed prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, and larger declines in these hormones were associated with greater contributions to household and infant care tasks postpartum. Women whose partners showed larger testosterone declines also reported receiving more support and more help with household tasks. Expectant mothers showed prenatal increases in testosterone and estradiol, and larger increases in these hormones were associated with lower partner-rated support. Together, our findings provide some of the first evidence that prenatal hormone changes may indeed be functional and that the implications of these changes may be detectable by co-parents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-90
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental psychobiology
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Parenting
Postpartum Period
Parents
Hormones
Testosterone
Estradiol
Infant Care
Fathers
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Edelstein, Robin S. ; Chopik, William J. ; Saxbe, Darby E. ; Wardecker, Britney ; Moors, Amy C. ; LaBelle, Onawa P. / Prospective and dyadic associations between expectant parents’ prenatal hormone changes and postpartum parenting outcomes. In: Developmental psychobiology. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 77-90.
@article{fe281c5c540a4b33b3f1ccaab01cebe4,
title = "Prospective and dyadic associations between expectant parents’ prenatal hormone changes and postpartum parenting outcomes",
abstract = "During the transition to parenthood, both men and women experience hormone changes that are thought to promote parental care. Yet very few studies have explicitly tested the hypothesis that prenatal hormone changes are associated with postpartum parenting behavior. In a longitudinal study of 27 first-time expectant couples, we assessed whether prenatal hormone changes were moderated by self- and partner-reported parenting outcomes at 3 months postpartum. Expectant fathers showed prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, and larger declines in these hormones were associated with greater contributions to household and infant care tasks postpartum. Women whose partners showed larger testosterone declines also reported receiving more support and more help with household tasks. Expectant mothers showed prenatal increases in testosterone and estradiol, and larger increases in these hormones were associated with lower partner-rated support. Together, our findings provide some of the first evidence that prenatal hormone changes may indeed be functional and that the implications of these changes may be detectable by co-parents.",
author = "Edelstein, {Robin S.} and Chopik, {William J.} and Saxbe, {Darby E.} and Britney Wardecker and Moors, {Amy C.} and LaBelle, {Onawa P.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/dev.21469",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "77--90",
journal = "Developmental Psychobiology",
issn = "0012-1630",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Prospective and dyadic associations between expectant parents’ prenatal hormone changes and postpartum parenting outcomes. / Edelstein, Robin S.; Chopik, William J.; Saxbe, Darby E.; Wardecker, Britney; Moors, Amy C.; LaBelle, Onawa P.

In: Developmental psychobiology, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 77-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective and dyadic associations between expectant parents’ prenatal hormone changes and postpartum parenting outcomes

AU - Edelstein, Robin S.

AU - Chopik, William J.

AU - Saxbe, Darby E.

AU - Wardecker, Britney

AU - Moors, Amy C.

AU - LaBelle, Onawa P.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - During the transition to parenthood, both men and women experience hormone changes that are thought to promote parental care. Yet very few studies have explicitly tested the hypothesis that prenatal hormone changes are associated with postpartum parenting behavior. In a longitudinal study of 27 first-time expectant couples, we assessed whether prenatal hormone changes were moderated by self- and partner-reported parenting outcomes at 3 months postpartum. Expectant fathers showed prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, and larger declines in these hormones were associated with greater contributions to household and infant care tasks postpartum. Women whose partners showed larger testosterone declines also reported receiving more support and more help with household tasks. Expectant mothers showed prenatal increases in testosterone and estradiol, and larger increases in these hormones were associated with lower partner-rated support. Together, our findings provide some of the first evidence that prenatal hormone changes may indeed be functional and that the implications of these changes may be detectable by co-parents.

AB - During the transition to parenthood, both men and women experience hormone changes that are thought to promote parental care. Yet very few studies have explicitly tested the hypothesis that prenatal hormone changes are associated with postpartum parenting behavior. In a longitudinal study of 27 first-time expectant couples, we assessed whether prenatal hormone changes were moderated by self- and partner-reported parenting outcomes at 3 months postpartum. Expectant fathers showed prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, and larger declines in these hormones were associated with greater contributions to household and infant care tasks postpartum. Women whose partners showed larger testosterone declines also reported receiving more support and more help with household tasks. Expectant mothers showed prenatal increases in testosterone and estradiol, and larger increases in these hormones were associated with lower partner-rated support. Together, our findings provide some of the first evidence that prenatal hormone changes may indeed be functional and that the implications of these changes may be detectable by co-parents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85003773078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85003773078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/dev.21469

DO - 10.1002/dev.21469

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 77

EP - 90

JO - Developmental Psychobiology

JF - Developmental Psychobiology

SN - 0012-1630

IS - 1

ER -