Prospective Association of Intimate Partner Violence with Receipt of Clinical Preventive Services in Women of Reproductive Age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have a greater risk for adverse health outcomes, suggesting the importance of preventive services in this group. Little prior research has explored how IPV exposure impacts receipt of relevant preventive services. We assess the prospective association of IPV exposure with receiving specific preventive services. Methods: Women in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study's longitudinal cohort study (conducted 2004-2007; n = 1,420) identified past-year exposure to IPV at baseline and receipt of IPV-relevant preventive services (counseling for safety and violence concerns, tests for sexually transmitted infections [STIs], counseling for STIs, Pap testing, counseling for smoking/tobacco use, alcohol/drug use, and birth control) at 2-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the impact of IPV on service receipt, controlling for relevant covariates. Findings: Women exposed to IPV had greater odds of receiving safety and violence counseling (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-4.61), and tests for STIs (AOR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.41-4.28) compared with women who had not been exposed to IPV. Independent of other predictors, including IPV, women who saw an obstetrician-gynecologist were more likely to receive Pap tests, STI/HIV testing and counseling, and birth control counseling, compared with women who had not seen an obstetrician-gynecologist. Conclusion: Overall rates of preventive service receipt for all women in the sample were low. Women exposed to IPV were more likely to receive safety and violence counseling and STI testing, and seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist increased the odds of receiving several preventive services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e109-e116
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Fingerprint

violence
Counseling
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
counseling
Violence
Contraception
Safety
Odds Ratio
family planning
Intimate Partner Violence
Confidence Intervals
Papanicolaou Test
confidence
Drug and Narcotic Control
Tobacco Use
Women's Health
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
health
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

@article{778474789fc64067b05a9933512a884a,
title = "Prospective Association of Intimate Partner Violence with Receipt of Clinical Preventive Services in Women of Reproductive Age",
abstract = "Background: Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have a greater risk for adverse health outcomes, suggesting the importance of preventive services in this group. Little prior research has explored how IPV exposure impacts receipt of relevant preventive services. We assess the prospective association of IPV exposure with receiving specific preventive services. Methods: Women in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study's longitudinal cohort study (conducted 2004-2007; n = 1,420) identified past-year exposure to IPV at baseline and receipt of IPV-relevant preventive services (counseling for safety and violence concerns, tests for sexually transmitted infections [STIs], counseling for STIs, Pap testing, counseling for smoking/tobacco use, alcohol/drug use, and birth control) at 2-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the impact of IPV on service receipt, controlling for relevant covariates. Findings: Women exposed to IPV had greater odds of receiving safety and violence counseling (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.40; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.25-4.61), and tests for STIs (AOR, 2.46; 95{\%} CI, 1.41-4.28) compared with women who had not been exposed to IPV. Independent of other predictors, including IPV, women who saw an obstetrician-gynecologist were more likely to receive Pap tests, STI/HIV testing and counseling, and birth control counseling, compared with women who had not seen an obstetrician-gynecologist. Conclusion: Overall rates of preventive service receipt for all women in the sample were low. Women exposed to IPV were more likely to receive safety and violence counseling and STI testing, and seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist increased the odds of receiving several preventive services.",
author = "McCall-Hosenfeld, {Jennifer S.} and Chuang, {Cynthia H.} and Weisman, {Carol S.}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.whi.2012.12.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "e109--e116",
journal = "Women's Health Issues",
issn = "1049-3867",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective Association of Intimate Partner Violence with Receipt of Clinical Preventive Services in Women of Reproductive Age

AU - McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S.

AU - Chuang, Cynthia H.

AU - Weisman, Carol S.

PY - 2013/3/1

Y1 - 2013/3/1

N2 - Background: Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have a greater risk for adverse health outcomes, suggesting the importance of preventive services in this group. Little prior research has explored how IPV exposure impacts receipt of relevant preventive services. We assess the prospective association of IPV exposure with receiving specific preventive services. Methods: Women in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study's longitudinal cohort study (conducted 2004-2007; n = 1,420) identified past-year exposure to IPV at baseline and receipt of IPV-relevant preventive services (counseling for safety and violence concerns, tests for sexually transmitted infections [STIs], counseling for STIs, Pap testing, counseling for smoking/tobacco use, alcohol/drug use, and birth control) at 2-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the impact of IPV on service receipt, controlling for relevant covariates. Findings: Women exposed to IPV had greater odds of receiving safety and violence counseling (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-4.61), and tests for STIs (AOR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.41-4.28) compared with women who had not been exposed to IPV. Independent of other predictors, including IPV, women who saw an obstetrician-gynecologist were more likely to receive Pap tests, STI/HIV testing and counseling, and birth control counseling, compared with women who had not seen an obstetrician-gynecologist. Conclusion: Overall rates of preventive service receipt for all women in the sample were low. Women exposed to IPV were more likely to receive safety and violence counseling and STI testing, and seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist increased the odds of receiving several preventive services.

AB - Background: Women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have a greater risk for adverse health outcomes, suggesting the importance of preventive services in this group. Little prior research has explored how IPV exposure impacts receipt of relevant preventive services. We assess the prospective association of IPV exposure with receiving specific preventive services. Methods: Women in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study's longitudinal cohort study (conducted 2004-2007; n = 1,420) identified past-year exposure to IPV at baseline and receipt of IPV-relevant preventive services (counseling for safety and violence concerns, tests for sexually transmitted infections [STIs], counseling for STIs, Pap testing, counseling for smoking/tobacco use, alcohol/drug use, and birth control) at 2-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the impact of IPV on service receipt, controlling for relevant covariates. Findings: Women exposed to IPV had greater odds of receiving safety and violence counseling (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-4.61), and tests for STIs (AOR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.41-4.28) compared with women who had not been exposed to IPV. Independent of other predictors, including IPV, women who saw an obstetrician-gynecologist were more likely to receive Pap tests, STI/HIV testing and counseling, and birth control counseling, compared with women who had not seen an obstetrician-gynecologist. Conclusion: Overall rates of preventive service receipt for all women in the sample were low. Women exposed to IPV were more likely to receive safety and violence counseling and STI testing, and seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist increased the odds of receiving several preventive services.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875407596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875407596&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.whi.2012.12.006

DO - 10.1016/j.whi.2012.12.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 23481691

AN - SCOPUS:84875407596

VL - 23

SP - e109-e116

JO - Women's Health Issues

JF - Women's Health Issues

SN - 1049-3867

IS - 2

ER -