Prospective associations among borderline personality disorder symptoms, interpersonal problems, and aggressive behaviors

Stephanie D. Stepp, Tiffany D. Smith, Jennifer Q. Morse, Michael Nelson Hallquist, Paul A. Pilkonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We controlled for other PD symptoms and demographic variables. BPD symptoms at baseline were associated with interpersonal sensitivity, interpersonal ambivalence, interpersonal aggression, need for social approval, and lack of sociability 6 months later. In turn, interpersonal sensitivity predicted not experiencing physical aggression, interpersonal aggression predicted experiencing physical aggression and perpetrating both psychological and physical aggression, need for social approval predicted experiencing both psychological and physical aggression, and lack of sociability predicted perpetrating physical aggression 2 years later. Results demonstrated that interpersonal problems mediated the relationship between BPD and later violent behaviors. Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing between these groups of aggressive behaviors in terms of etiological pathways, maintenance processes, and treatment interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-124
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Borderline Personality Disorder
Aggression
Psychology
Crime Victims
Psychiatry
Maintenance
Demography
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Stepp, Stephanie D. ; Smith, Tiffany D. ; Morse, Jennifer Q. ; Hallquist, Michael Nelson ; Pilkonis, Paul A. / Prospective associations among borderline personality disorder symptoms, interpersonal problems, and aggressive behaviors. In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 103-124.
@article{e976682cbefa49558acc1f96c00a1206,
title = "Prospective associations among borderline personality disorder symptoms, interpersonal problems, and aggressive behaviors",
abstract = "This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We controlled for other PD symptoms and demographic variables. BPD symptoms at baseline were associated with interpersonal sensitivity, interpersonal ambivalence, interpersonal aggression, need for social approval, and lack of sociability 6 months later. In turn, interpersonal sensitivity predicted not experiencing physical aggression, interpersonal aggression predicted experiencing physical aggression and perpetrating both psychological and physical aggression, need for social approval predicted experiencing both psychological and physical aggression, and lack of sociability predicted perpetrating physical aggression 2 years later. Results demonstrated that interpersonal problems mediated the relationship between BPD and later violent behaviors. Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing between these groups of aggressive behaviors in terms of etiological pathways, maintenance processes, and treatment interventions.",
author = "Stepp, {Stephanie D.} and Smith, {Tiffany D.} and Morse, {Jennifer Q.} and Hallquist, {Michael Nelson} and Pilkonis, {Paul A.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0886260511416468",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "103--124",
journal = "Journal of Interpersonal Violence",
issn = "0886-2605",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Prospective associations among borderline personality disorder symptoms, interpersonal problems, and aggressive behaviors. / Stepp, Stephanie D.; Smith, Tiffany D.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Hallquist, Michael Nelson; Pilkonis, Paul A.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 103-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prospective associations among borderline personality disorder symptoms, interpersonal problems, and aggressive behaviors

AU - Stepp, Stephanie D.

AU - Smith, Tiffany D.

AU - Morse, Jennifer Q.

AU - Hallquist, Michael Nelson

AU - Pilkonis, Paul A.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We controlled for other PD symptoms and demographic variables. BPD symptoms at baseline were associated with interpersonal sensitivity, interpersonal ambivalence, interpersonal aggression, need for social approval, and lack of sociability 6 months later. In turn, interpersonal sensitivity predicted not experiencing physical aggression, interpersonal aggression predicted experiencing physical aggression and perpetrating both psychological and physical aggression, need for social approval predicted experiencing both psychological and physical aggression, and lack of sociability predicted perpetrating physical aggression 2 years later. Results demonstrated that interpersonal problems mediated the relationship between BPD and later violent behaviors. Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing between these groups of aggressive behaviors in terms of etiological pathways, maintenance processes, and treatment interventions.

AB - This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We controlled for other PD symptoms and demographic variables. BPD symptoms at baseline were associated with interpersonal sensitivity, interpersonal ambivalence, interpersonal aggression, need for social approval, and lack of sociability 6 months later. In turn, interpersonal sensitivity predicted not experiencing physical aggression, interpersonal aggression predicted experiencing physical aggression and perpetrating both psychological and physical aggression, need for social approval predicted experiencing both psychological and physical aggression, and lack of sociability predicted perpetrating physical aggression 2 years later. Results demonstrated that interpersonal problems mediated the relationship between BPD and later violent behaviors. Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing between these groups of aggressive behaviors in terms of etiological pathways, maintenance processes, and treatment interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=83355168141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=83355168141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0886260511416468

DO - 10.1177/0886260511416468

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 103

EP - 124

JO - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

JF - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

SN - 0886-2605

IS - 1

ER -